tonic accent


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tonic accent

n. Linguistics
A stress produced by a change, especially a rise, in pitch as distinguished from increased volume. Also called pitch accent.

tonic accent

n
1. (Classical Music) emphasis imparted to a note by virtue of its having a higher pitch, rather than greater stress or long duration relative to other notes
2. (Phonetics & Phonology) another term for pitch accent

ton′ic ac′cent


n.
prominence given to a syllable in speaking, usu. due to a change, esp. a rise, in pitch.
[1865–70]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tonic accent - emphasis that results from pitch rather than loudnesstonic accent - emphasis that results from pitch rather than loudness
stress, accent, emphasis - the relative prominence of a syllable or musical note (especially with regard to stress or pitch); "he put the stress on the wrong syllable"
References in periodicals archive ?
In order to recognize in which cases one should run the vowels together, and in which cases to the contrary, one must isolate them, it is necessary to consider the place which the tonic accent occupies.
Cornulier, for his part ('La place de l'accent, ou l'accent a sa place'), warns against definitions that give priority to accent, because lines are not metrically constituted by having accents on particular syllables: given that metricality is supplied by a certain number of syllables demarcated by the last 'anatonic' vowel, the accent goes where it has to; it is the lastness of the anatonic vowel which constitutes a sequence of a certain number of syllables as a metrical unit; and the word-/group-terminal status of a tonic accent is not, in French, peculiar to verse.
The first theme of a traditional sonata-allegro movement is almost always front-accented: its strongest accent is the tonic accent that grounds the beginning of the piece, and the music moves away from this point.
In lines 1--5, which represent the norm, the first hemistich moves towards a tonic accent on g, which is plicated and followed by an e, post-tonic, that is evidently weaker.