tonnage


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Related to tonnage: Deadweight tonnage, Net Tonnage

ton·nage

 (tŭn′ĭj)
n.
1. The number of tons of water that a ship displaces when afloat.
2. The capacity of a merchant ship, often measured in units of 100 cubic feet.
3. A duty or charge per ton on cargo, as at a port or canal.
4. The total shipping of a country or port, figured in tons, with reference to carrying capacity.
5. Weight measured in tons.

[ton + -age. Sense 3, Middle English, from Old French, from tonne, tun; see tonne.]

tonnage

(ˈtʌnɪdʒ) or

tunnage

n
1. (Commerce) the capacity of a merchant ship expressed in tons, for which purpose a ton is considered as 40 cubic feet of freight or 100 cubic feet of bulk cargo, unless such an amount would weigh more than 2000 pounds in which case the actual weight is used
2. (Commerce) the weight of the cargo of a merchant ship
3. (Commerce) the total amount of shipping of a port or nation, estimated by the capacity of its ships
4. (Commerce) a duty on ships based either on their capacity or their register tonnage
[C15: from Old French, from tonne barrel]

ton•nage

(ˈtʌn ɪdʒ)

n.
1. the capacity of a merchant vessel, expressed either in units of weight, as deadweight tons, or of volume, as gross tons.
2. ships collectively considered with reference to their carrying capacity or together with their cargoes.
3. a duty on ships or boats at so much per ton of cargo or freight, or according to the capacity in tons.
[1375–1425; late Middle English: duty < Old French. See ton1, -age]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tonnage - a tax imposed on ships that enter the UStonnage - a tax imposed on ships that enter the US; based on the tonnage of the ship
tariff, duty - a government tax on imports or exports; "they signed a treaty to lower duties on trade between their countries"
Translations
طُنِّيَّه، الوزْن بالطُّن
tonáž
lasteevnetonnage
tonnatartalom
lestarrÿmi
tonáž

tonnage

[ˈtʌnɪdʒ] N (= weight) → tonelaje m

tonnage

[ˈtʌnɪdʒ] ntonnage m

tonnage

nTonnage f

tonnage

[ˈtʌnɪdʒ] n (Naut) → tonnellaggio, stazza

ton

(tan) noun
1. a unit of weight, 2,240 lb, (American) 2,000 lb; a metric ton (also tonne (tan) ) is 2,204.6 lb (1,000 kilogrammes). It weighs a ton and a half; a three-ton weight.
2. a unit of space in a ship (100 cubic feet).
ˈtonnage (-nidʒ) noun
the space available on a ship, measured in tons.
tons noun plural
a lot. I've got tons of letters to write.
References in classic literature ?
and there were sundry questions about tonnage and poundage and ship-money, which most of them appeared unable to answer; still, every little difficulty was solved instantly when it reached Burns: her memory seemed to have retained the substance of the whole lesson, and she was ready with answers on every point.
On our little walk along the quays, he made himself the most interesting companion, telling me about the different ships that we passed by, their rig, tonnage, and nationality, explaining the work that was going forward--how one was discharging, another taking in cargo, and a third making ready for sea--and every now and then telling me some little anecdote of ships or seamen or repeating a nautical phrase till I had learned it perfectly.
No State shall, without the consent of Congress, lay any duty on tonnage, keep troops or ships of war in time of peace, enter into any agreement or compact with another State, or with a foreign power, or engage in war unless actually invaded, or in such imminent danger as will not admit of delay.
The sea was less boisterous, since the wind came off land--a fortunate circumstance for the boat, which would suffer, owing to its small tonnage, by a heavy surge on the sea.
His contention is that racing, without time allowances for anything else but tonnage - that is, for size - has fostered the fine art of sailing to the pitch of perfection.
Astor to have coasting vessels of his own, at Astoria, of small tonnage and draft of water, fitted for coasting service.
No State shall, without the Consent of Congress, lay any Duty of Tonnage, keep Troops, or Ships of War in time of Peace, enter into any Agreement or Compact with another State, or with a foreign Power, or engage in War, unless actually invaded, or in such imminent Danger as will not admit of delay.
There were thirty-six ships of fair tonnage which were reported there during those months.
I said that if that potentate must go over in our ship, why, I supposed he must --but that to my thinking, when the United States considered it necessary to send a dignitary of that tonnage across the ocean, it would be in better taste, and safer, to take him apart and cart him over in sections in several ships.
He stood with a map on Mercator's projection before him, swaying to the swinging of the ship and talking of guns and tonnage, of ships and their build and powers and speed, of strategic points, and bases of operation.
She could sail two points nearer the wind than anything of her tonnage in the service.
With such assurance, and rather wondering what might have taken place if it HAD been anything about tonnage, Mr Clennam withdrew to pursue his inquiries.