tonometer

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to·nom·e·ter

 (tō-nŏm′ĭ-tər)
n.
1. Any of various instruments for measuring pressure or tension.
2. An instrument for measuring hydrostatic pressure within the eyeball, used to detect glaucoma.
3. Music An instrument, such as a graduated set of tuning forks, used to determine the pitch or vibration rate of tones.

[Greek tonos, tension; see tone + -meter.]

to′no·met′ric (tō′nə-mĕt′rĭk) adj.
to·nom′e·try n.

tonometer

(təʊˈnɒmɪtə)
n
1. (General Physics) an instrument for measuring the pitch of a sound, esp one consisting of a set of tuning forks
2. (Medicine) any of various types of instrument for measuring pressure or tension, such as the blood pressure, vapour pressure, etc
[C18: from Greek tonos tone + -meter]
tonometric adj
toˈnometry n

to•nom•e•ter

(toʊˈnɒm ɪ tər)

n.
1. an instrument for measuring the frequencies of tones, as a tuning fork.
2. any of various instruments for measuring intraocular pressure or blood pressure.
[1715–25]
ton•o•met•ric (ˌtɒn əˈmɛ trɪk, ˌtoʊ nə-) adj.
to•nom′e•try, n.

tonometer

an instrument for determining the pitch of a tone, as a tuning fork or graduated set of tuning forks. — tonometric, adj.
See also: Tuning
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tonometer - measuring instrument for measuring tension or pressure (especially for measuring intraocular pressure in testing for glaucoma)tonometer - measuring instrument for measuring tension or pressure (especially for measuring intraocular pressure in testing for glaucoma)
measuring device, measuring instrument, measuring system - instrument that shows the extent or amount or quantity or degree of something
Translations

tonometer

[təʊˈnɒmɪtəʳ] Ntonómetro m

to·nom·e·ter

n. tonómetro, instrumento usado para medir la tensión o presión esp. intraocular.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Significant differences were found between the measurement results of each of the three tonometric methods.
The central corneal thickness and tonometric values (IOP) were recorded on a proforma containing the patient's identity and all the necessary details required for the study.
5) Usually, at least three videos (and up to five) of twenty seconds each are taken, mainly of both sides of the frenulum of the tongue since this is easily accessed, has an embryonic origin in common with the intestine and, for this reason, exhibits a good tonometric correlation with gastric PCO2.
To answer this issue, experimental studies involving concomitant manometric and tonometric readings are necessary.