too-too

too′-too′


Informal. adj.
1. excessively or tastelessly affected.
adv.
2. in an excessively or tastelessly affected manner.
[1890–95]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
Translations

too-too

adj pred (dated inf: = marvellous) → pfundig (inf); (iro, = affected) → affig (inf)
adv (= excessively)zu
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
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References in periodicals archive ?
Of course, judicial villains rose, too-too many to list in my limited space.
For underlying this scandal of Russian influence on the American political system is the question of why they and many other peoples know us too-too well, while we seem to know them all too-too little.
Most memorably, we encounter the "too-too girls," young women who wear too much lipstick, whose dresses are too short and too tight, whose voices are too loud, and who embody the spirit of black urban life.
(45) Barclay and Anderson similarly publicised the 'admirable and new tryed properties' of the Kinghorn spring, which had been 'latelie found, and newlie knowne, [and] too-too long vnknowne'.
How do we get a luxurious look for a black-tie event without looking too-too?
You can't do anything too-too. The intensity can be there without exaggerating, as Iong as you and your partner are on the same wavelength.
Beware of major tiers, which are just too-too. $57, lulus.com
Words such as really-really, very-very, much much, too-too, awfully-awfully, dark-dark, beautiful-beautiful, horrible-horrible, wonderful-wonderful, enormous-enormous, slowly-slowly, goody-goody, quietly-quietly, et cetera (hardly English).
Additionally, in one verse, the jealous wife dons the yellow stockings as well: For yellow love is too-too bad, without all wit or pollicie; And too much love hath made her mad, and fill'd her full of jealousie.
At two-and-a-half, he's a veteran traveller on the Metro, the bus, the car and on (his favourite mode of transport) the too-too at South Shields' Marine Park.
But Davies adds Camden's observation that this was a custom that would probably not be well received in England: "I feare husbands will not like this note, for that some of their dames may bee ambitiously over-pert and too-too forward to imitate it." (95) Whatever led Elizabeth Pickering to publish under her maiden name, her choice was not repeated later in the Tudor-Stuart era by any of the other widows who continued their husband's printing activity.
For some, this will be a bit too-too, but I enjoy honest reflection that admits that both sides need and get space.