fluoride

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fluor·ide

 (flo͝or′īd′, flôr′-)
n.
Univalent fluorine, or a compound of fluorine, especially a binary compound of fluorine with a more electropositive element.

American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

fluoride

(ˈflʊəˌraɪd)
n
1. (Chemistry) any salt of hydrofluoric acid, containing the fluoride ion, F
2. (Chemistry) any compound containing fluorine, such as methyl fluoride
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

fluor•ide

(ˈflʊər aɪd, ˈflɔr-, ˈfloʊr-)

n.
1. a salt of hydrofluoric acid consisting of two elements, one of which is fluorine, as sodium fluoride, NaF.
2. a compound containing fluorine.
[1820–30]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

fluor·ide

(flo͝or′īd′)
A compound containing fluorine and another element or radical.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.fluoride - a salt of hydrofluoric acid
boron trifluoride - a pungent colorless gas
halide - a salt of any halogen acid
hydrogen fluoride - a colorless poisonous corrosive liquid made by the action of sulphuric acid on calcium fluoride; solutions in water are hydrofluoric acid
stannous fluoride - a white powder that is used to fluoridate toothpaste
sulfur hexafluoride, sulphur hexafluoride - a colorless gas that is soluble in alcohol and ether; a powerful greenhouse gas widely used in the electrical utility industry
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
مُرَكَّب الفلور
fluorid
fluor
fluorid
flúoríî
florasfloridas
fluorīds
fluorid
flüorür

fluoride

[ˈflʊəraɪd]
A. Nfluoruro m
B. CPD fluoride toothpaste Npasta f de dientes con flúor
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

fluoride

[ˈflʊəraɪd] nfluorure mfluoride toothpaste ndentifrice m au fluor
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

fluoride

nFluorid nt; fluoride toothpasteFluorzahnpasta f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

fluoride

[ˈflʊəˌraɪd] nfluoruro
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

fluoride

(ˈfluəraid) noun
any of several substances containing fluorine, especially one which helps to prevent tooth decay.
fluorine (ˈfluəriːn) noun
an element, a pale greenish-yellow gas.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

fluor·ide

n. fluoruro, combinación de flúor con un metal o metaloide.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

fluoride

n fluoruro
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Introduction of systemic and topical fluorides into the prevention and control of dental caries denotes the most significant issue in dentistry.
Featherstone, "Fluoride concentrations in plaque, whole saliva, and ductal saliva after application of home-use topical fluorides," Journal of Dental Research, vol.
(1991) reviewed the effect of topical fluoride on titanium and concluded that toothbrushes used in contact with titanium surfaces should be as non-abrasive as possible and that long lasting contamination with topical fluorides should be avoided.
Optimal intake of fluoride lowers the decay of teeth.1 A decline in dental caries in the developed countries has been attributed to the widespread use of systemic and topical fluorides. The topical sources of fluoride are mouth rinses, tooth pastes while systemic sources can be community drinking water, beverages and foods.1,2 Water fluoridation has been implemented successfully to supply the fluoride to the community.2 In Peninsula Malaysia, water fluoridation has been accepted as a government policy in 1972.3 The recommended level of water fluoridation by the Ministry of Health, Malaysia, is 0.5 - 0.9 mg/L.3
Hence the focus of the fluoride usage is on topical fluorides. But water fluoridation is also considered as one of the major public health initiative, which reduces the health related disparities among various communities.
Fluoride gel has the best cost-benefit relationship when compared to other types of topical fluorides. (7) However, adverse effects from fluoride gel have been reported, especially in children.
Physicochemical perspectives on the cariostatic mechanisms of systemic and topical fluorides. J Dent Res 1990; 69:606-613.
Topical fluorides or chlorhexidine rinses may lead to reduced levels of S.

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