topmast

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Related to topmasts: main topmast

top·mast

 (tŏp′məst, -măst′)
n.
The section of mast below the topgallant mast in a square-rigged ship and highest in a fore-and-aft-rigged ship.

topmast

(ˈtɒpˌmɑːst; ˈtɒpməst)
n
(Nautical Terms) the mast next above a lower mast on a sailing vessel

top•mast

(ˈtɒpˌmæst, -ˌmɑst; Naut. -məst)

n.
the mast next above a lower mast, usu. formed as a separate spar from the lower mast and used to support the yards or rigging of a topsail.
[1475–85]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.topmast - the mast next above a lower mast and topmost in a fore-and-aft rigtopmast - the mast next above a lower mast and topmost in a fore-and-aft rig
fore-topmast - the topmast next above the foremast
main-topmast - the topmast next above the mainmast
mast - a vertical spar for supporting sails
royal mast - topmast immediately above the topgallant mast
topgallant mast, topgallant - a mast fixed to the head of a topmast on a square-rigged vessel
Translations

topmast

[ˈtɒpmɑːst] Nmastelero m
References in classic literature ?
The staffs themselves were like ships' masts, with topmasts spliced on in true nautical fashion, with shrouds, ratlines, gaffs, and flag-halyards.
But it is time that we took our order, for methinks that between the Needle rocks and the Alum cliffs yonder I can catch a glimpse of the topmasts of the galleys.
However, the Roads being reckoned as good as a harbour, the anchorage good, and our ground- tackle very strong, our men were unconcerned, and not in the least apprehensive of danger, but spent the time in rest and mirth, after the manner of the sea; but the eighth day, in the morning, the wind increased, and we had all hands at work to strike our topmasts, and make everything snug and close, that the ship might ride as easy as possible.
Chimney, white with crusted salt; topmasts struck; storm-sails set; rigging all knotted, tangled, wet, and drooping: a gloomier picture it would be hard to look upon.
True, the wind itself tore our canvas out of the gaskets, jerked out our topmasts, and made a raffle of our running gear, but still we would have come through nicely had we not been square in front of the advancing storm center.