torn


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torn

 (tôrn)
v.
Past participle of tear1.

torn

(tɔːn)
vb
1. the past participle of tear12
2. that's torn it slang Brit an unexpected event or circumstance has upset one's plans
adj
3. split or cut
4. divided or undecided, as in preference: he was torn between staying and leaving.

tear1

(tɪər)

n.
1. a drop of the saline, watery fluid continually secreted by the lacrimal glands between the surface of the eye and the eyelid.
2. a drop of this fluid appearing in or flowing from the eye as the result of emotion, esp. grief.
3. something resembling a tear, as a drop of a liquid or a tearlike mass of a solid substance.
4. tears,
a. grief; sorrow.
b. an act of weeping: bored to tears.
v.i.
5. (of the eyes) to fill up and overflow with tears.
Idioms:
in tears, weeping.
[before 900; (n.) Middle English teer, Old English tēar, tæher]

tear2

(tɛər)

v. tore, torn, tear•ing,
n. v.t.
1. to pull apart or in pieces by force; rend.
2. to pull or snatch violently; wrench away with force: to tear a book from someone's hands.
3. to divide or disrupt: a country torn by civil war.
4. to produce by rending: to tear a hole in one's coat.
5. to wound or injure by or as if by rending; lacerate: grief that tears the heart.
6. to remove by force or effort (often fol. by away): It was such an exciting lecture, I couldn't tear myself away.
v.i.
7. to become torn: The fabric tears easily.
8. to move or behave with force, violent haste, or energy: The wind tore through the trees; cars tearing up and down the highway.
9. tear at,
a. to pluck violently at.
b. to distress; afflict.
10. tear down,
a. to pull down; demolish.
b. to disparage or discredit.
11. tear into, to attack impulsively or viciously.
12. tear up,
a. to tear into small shreds.
b. to cancel or annul: to tear up a contract.
n.
13. the act of tearing.
14. a rent or fissure.
15. a rage or passionate outburst.
16. Informal. a spree.
Idioms:
tear it, Slang. to ruin all chances for a successful outcome.
[before 900; Middle English teren (v.), Old English teran, c. Old Frisian tera, Old Saxon terian, Old High German zeran, Greek dérein to flay]
tear′er, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.torn - having edges that are jagged from injurytorn - having edges that are jagged from injury
injured - harmed; "injured soldiers"; "injured feelings"
2.torn - disrupted by the pull of contrary forcestorn - disrupted by the pull of contrary forces; "torn between love and hate"; "torn by conflicting loyalties"; "torn by religious dissensions"
divided - separated into parts or pieces; "opinions are divided"

torn

adjective
1. cut, split, rent, ripped, ragged, slit, lacerated a torn photograph
2. undecided, divided, uncertain, split, unsure, wavering, vacillating, in two minds (informal), irresolute I know the administration was very torn on this subject.
Translations

torn

[ˈtɔːrn]
pp of tear
adj (= unable to choose) → partagé(e)
torn between → déchiré(e) entre

torn

pp de tear
References in classic literature ?
During these days the boy rode Sir Mortimer abroad in many directions until he knew every bypath within a radius of fifty miles of Torn.
On one occasion he chanced upon a hut at the outskirts of a small hamlet not far from Torn, and, with the curiosity of boyhood, determined to enter and have speech with the inmates, for by this time the natural desire for companionship was commencing to assert itself.
I am no king's man," replied the boy quietly, "I am Norman of Torn, who has neither a king nor a god, and who says 'by your leave' to no man.
Then we shall be friends, Norman of Torn, for albeit I have few enemies no man has too many friends, and I like your face and your manner, though there be much to wish for in your manners.
Whenever he could do so Norman of Torn visited his friend, Father Claude.
Norman of Torn could scarce repress a smile at this clever ruse of the old priest, and, assuming a similar attitude, he replied in French:
The good Father Claude does not know Norman of Torn if he thinks he runs out the back door like an old woman because a sword looks in at the front door.
It is sufficient that he is the friend of Norman of Torn, and that Norman of Torn be here in person to acknowledge the debt of friendship.
But Norman of Torn saw red when he fought and the red lured him ever on into the thickest of the fray.