torte

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torte

 (tôrt, tôr′tə)
n.
A rich cake made with many eggs and little flour and usually containing chopped nuts.

[German, perhaps from Italian torta, cake, tart, from Late Latin tōrta, a kind of bread; see tortilla.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

torte

(tɔːt; German ˈtɔrtə)
n
(Cookery) a rich cake, originating in Austria, usually decorated or filled with cream, fruit, nuts, and jam
[C16: ultimately perhaps from Late Latin tōrta a round loaf, of uncertain origin]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

torte

(tɔrt; Ger. ˈtɔr tə)

n., pl. tortes (tôrts), Ger.tor•ten (ˈtɔr tn)
a rich cake made with eggs, ground nuts, and usu. no flour.
[1955–60; < German < Italian torta < Late Latin tōrta (panis) round loaf (of bread)]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.torte - rich cake usually covered with cream and fruit or nutstorte - rich cake usually covered with cream and fruit or nuts; originated in Austria
cake - baked goods made from or based on a mixture of flour, sugar, eggs, and fat
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
torta
References in periodicals archive ?
Torten and W.Kaplan (Eds.), CRC Press Inc., Boca Raton, Florida, 1979; pp 495-514.
He eventually became the company president before leaving to launch Torten.
(163.) Henderson GL, Frincke J, Leung CY, Torten M, Benjamini E.
1340 Torten, S., Darfur: strategic victimhood strikes again?
Rather, it is a marker that all reasonable alternatives--such as mediation, diplomacy, and sanctions--have been tried and failed "before you 'let loose the dogs of war.'" For Walzer, political leaders must cross that threshold with "great reluctance and trepidation." (24) As Mark Torten argues in his recent book, First Strike, however, "against the new threat of global terrorism the point of last resort may arrive prior to the point of imminence." For Totten, the threshold is crossed when "other alternatives become unreasonable insofar as pursuing them would seriously jeopardize achieving the legitimate end of self-defense.
Torten & Nicholas Tyler, Arguing for an Integrated Approach to Resolving the Crisis in Darfur: the Challenges of Complementarity, Enforcement, and Related Issues in the International Criminal Court, 98(3) J.
(42) Raphael Lemkin, Totally Unofficial Man, in PIONEERS OF GENOCIDE STUDIES 365, 371 (Samuel Torten & Steven Leonard Jacobs eds., 2002).
"Analysis has shown that three months has been clinically and statistically significant," said Finch Torten. "We're going to offer the compressed program knowing it is effective and a better price point for companies."
Reynolds did refer to Torten to illustrate a situation where even compelling necessity could not overcome a privilege claim: "[T]he very subject matter of the action, a contract to perform espionage, was a matter of state secret.