tortoise beetle


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tortoise beetle

n.
Any of various small chrysomelid beetles having spiny larvae and a domed body shaped somewhat like that of a tortoise.

tortoise beetle

n
(Animals) a metallic-coloured leaf beetle of the genus Cassida, in which the elytra and terga cover the body like a shell

tor′toise bee`tle


n.
any of several turtle-shaped, brightly colored leaf beetles of the subfamily Cassidinae.
[1705–15]
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* The least reported bug is the Imperial tortoise beetle, which so far has been reported just once.
Amazing detailed photo-portraits show a snake, a frog and tadpole, a white-tailed deer, a beaver, a skunk, a Virginia opossum, a fox, a bald eagle, a muskrat, a woodpecker, a porcupine, a honey bee, and a tortoise beetle. At the end of the portraits and narratives is an educational section called For Creative Minds, including How Animals Use Their Tails, a Match the Tail game, and a section on Tail Adaptations.
However, this isn't an issue in nature, as some creatures, such as the thistle tortoise beetle, possess a hyper-elongated organ "flagellum" or penis, which might inspire the construction of a more effective catheter.
Year 4 pupils at the C of E primary school have been observing wildlife and painting butterflies and doing literacy work and, during a visit to the wildlife area led by Tees Valley Wildlife Trust, spotted a green tortoise beetle which pulls in its antennae and feet when attacked.
Most tortoise beetle larvae carry an exuvial or exuvio-fecal shield on the furca of their eighth abdominal segment which serves as a mechanical or chemical barrier against predators [74-76].
The Panamanian golden tortoise beetle also changes colors--from gold to red.
The Panamanian golden tortoise beetle, however, changes color dramatically from metallic gold to matte red by a very different method, researchers report.
The larvae (immature form) of the tortoise beetle species Hemisphaerota cynaea may nab the Oscar for nature's most disgusting defense-maker.
Extensive screening of possible biological controls in 1996 and 1997 led the scientists to the 5- to 6-millimeter-long tortoise beetle, Gratiana boliviana.
Olmstead and Denno (1993) found that hemipteran predators with similar beaks were effective at circumventing defensive shields of tortoise beetle larvae.