totara


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totara

(ˈtəʊtərə)
n
(Plants) a tall coniferous forest tree, Podocarpus totara, of New Zealand, having a hard durable wood
[Māori]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.totara - valuable timber tree of New Zealand yielding hard reddish wood used for furniture and bridges and wharvestotara - valuable timber tree of New Zealand yielding hard reddish wood used for furniture and bridges and wharves
genus Podocarpus, Podocarpus - evergreen trees or shrubs; sometimes classified as member of the family Taxaceae
conifer, coniferous tree - any gymnospermous tree or shrub bearing cones
References in periodicals archive ?
Global stock exchanges play a big role in aiding the progress of women's placement on corporate boards, according toTara Giunta, editor of the report, "Breaking the Glass Ceiling: Women in the Boardroom -- A Study of Major Global Exchanges" and a litigation partner at Paul Hastings.
Wiremu Puke carved a replica carving in totara wood of a wooden panel collected by Joseph Banks, botanist of Captain James Cook's first visit to New Zealand in 1769.
Totara virginiana (L.) Raf.; SYN: Polygonum tirginianum L., Persicaria tirginiana (L.) Gaertn.; Jumpseed, Virginia knotweed; Successional woods north of creek; Abundant and widespread; C = 3; BSUH 18018.
A mighty totara has fallen, but the forest remains strong and Robin's legacy will go on.
In an upwelling of anger (ostensibly because his father continually tugs 'at the rein until Dusty's mouth gets hurt'), Simon imagines splitting his father's head like a '[b]ig old lump of totara' (Plays, p.
* Extracts from the Totara and Manuka trees act in a similar way to broccoli, according to scientists from a New Zealand report.
Totara North School principal Bastienne Kruger had removed the skeleton from storage and was about to use it in class when on close examination she saw that the teaching aid was not plastic as she had assumed.
Distribucion y sustratos: se ha encontrado en una gran variedad de sustratos para Nueva Zelanda (Hughes, 1979), ademas sobre ramas muertas de un arbol no identificado en Cuba (Holubova-Jechova y Mercado-Sierra, 1984); en Podocarpus totara en Inglaterra (Kirk, 1986) y sobre troncos sumergidos en Australia (Hyde y Goh, 1998).
The new hospital was located in Pipitea Street, on the same site as the earthquake-damaged Colonial Hospital, but was built on one level, constructed of timber (totara and rimu), contained five wards and had a capacity for accommodating a total of 40 patients.
Just as a totara is only felled in order to make a waka, the effort of study and the interventions of learning advisors occur in the larger context of producing graduates who contribute significantly to their world.
they drag him across the paddock with block and tackle to a totara