totemism


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to·tem·ism

 (tō′tə-mĭz′əm)
n.
1. A belief in totems or in kinship through common affiliation to a totem.
2. The practice of establishing affiliation through totems.

to′tem·ist n.
to′tem·is′tic adj.

totemism

(ˈtəʊtəˌmɪzəm)
n
1. (Anthropology & Ethnology) the belief in kinship of groups or individuals having a common totem
2. (Anthropology & Ethnology) the rituals, taboos, and other practices associated with such a belief
ˈtotemist n
ˌtotemˈistic adj

to•tem•ism

(ˈtoʊ təˌmɪz əm)

n.
1. the practice of having totems.
2. the system of tribal division according to totems.
[1785–95, Amer.]
to′tem•ist, to′tem•ite`, n.
to`tem•is′tic, adj.

totemism

1. the practice of having a natural object or animate being, as a bird or animal, as the emblem of a family, clan, or group.
2. the practice of regarding such a totem as mystically related to the family, clan, or group and therefore not to be hunted.
3. a system of tribal organization according to totems. — totemic, adj.
See also: Society

totemism

Originally a North American term, totemism is used to refer to a mystical or ritual relationship between a social group and a class of objects such as a species of plant or animal.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.totemism - belief in the kinship of a group of people with a common totemtotemism - belief in the kinship of a group of people with a common totem
belief - any cognitive content held as true
Translations

totemism

[ˈtəʊtəmɪzəm] Ntotemismo m

totemism

nTotemismus m
References in periodicals archive ?
Freud (2004: 3) defines taboo in the context of ancient Aboriginal Australian, and explains that Aboriginal Australians profess totemism as their system of tribal life.
Tengrism is a Central Asian religion characterized by shamanism, animism, totemism, poly and monotheism and ancestor worship.
Since time immemorial, the Shona believed in totemism, a practice whereby particular groups of people were identified with particular wild animals.
For example, totemism was one of the observed taboos where one was not allowed to eat their totem animal [25].
Girard cites myths from nations across the world that involve hidden sacrifice and in which scapegoats emerge as gods, including Claude Levi-Strauss's Ojibwa and Tikopia tales in his Totemism, Euripides's The Bacchae, and Philostratus's Life of Apollonius of Tyana, as well as Inca and Hindu practices, Romulus and Oedipus, and many others.
This phenomenon, called "totemism", is observed in many tribes of central and south India including the Todas of Nilgiris, and the Ho and Mundas of central India (Frazer 2009).
Further, Descola's model (2006), which posits four ontologies (animism, totemism, analogism, and naturalism), considers hierarchic ontologies as being more constitutive of analogism (different interiorities, different physicalities) (p.
Totemism, as a first attempt of a religious science, focuses on the idea of the totem-animal, which is, at the same time, idealized and feared.
We can thus make the tacit link from the demonic to paganism, mysticism, totemism, and cannibalism: to everything beyond the pale of Christianity at its formation.
Totemism is a complex social phenomenon where individuals or groups form a mystical or emotional relationship with a venerated or sacred object, the totem, usually an animal.
Acknowledging that the murder motif lodges itself uncomfortably in Freud's attempt to explain the evolution of sexual prohibitions, and the power of totemism, Girard frees the concept of collective murder from the context Freud assigns it, positing it instead as a function of religion and a means of restoring social order.
The first modern men would bury their dead by promoting funeral rites that would use totemism, with carcasses or images of animals deposited in the tombs, characterizing the dead with peculiarities of the animal in question.