touchily


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touch·y

 (tŭch′ē)
adj. touch·i·er, touch·i·est
1. Tending to take offense with slight cause; oversensitive.
2. Requiring special tact or skill in handling; delicate: a touchy situation.
3. Highly sensitive to touch. Used of a body part.
4. Easily ignited or exploded.

touch′i·ly adv.
touch′i·ness n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.touchily - in a touchy mannertouchily - in a touchy manner; "he touchily refused all offers to help"
Translations
بِحَساسِيَةٍ شَديدَه
nedůtklivě
érzékenykedve
meî fyrtni
nedotklivo
alınganlıkla

touch

(tatʃ) verb
1. to be in, come into, or make, contact with something else. Their shoulders touched; He touched the water with his foot.
2. to feel (lightly) with the hand. He touched her cheek.
3. to affect the feelings of; to make (someone) feel pity, sympathy etc. I was touched by her generosity.
4. to be concerned with; to have anything to do with. I wouldn't touch a job like that.
noun
1. an act or sensation of touching. I felt a touch on my shoulder.
2. (often with the) one of the five senses, the sense by which we feel things. the sense of touch; The stone felt cold to the touch.
3. a mark or stroke etc to improve the appearance of something. The painting still needs a few finishing touches.
4. skill or style. He hasn't lost his touch as a writer.
5. (in football) the ground outside the edges of the pitch (which are marked out with ˈtouchlines). He kicked the ball into touch.
ˈtouching adjective
moving; causing emotion. a touching story.
ˈtouchingly adverb
in a moving way, so as to cause emotion. Her face was touchingly childlike.
ˈtouchy adjective
easily annoyed or offended. You're very touchy today; in rather a touchy mood.
ˈtouchily adverb
ˈtouchiness noun
ˈtouch screen noun
a computer screen that responds to the user's touch on its surface.
in touch (with)
in communication (with). I have kept in touch with my school-friends.
lose touch (with)
to stop communicating (with). I used to see him quite often but we have lost touch.
out of touch (with)
1. not in communication (with).
2. not sympathetic or understanding (towards). Older people sometimes seem out of touch with the modern world.
a touch
a small quantity or degree. The soup needs a touch of salt; a touch of imagination.
touch down
1. (of aircraft) to land. The plane should touch down at 2 o'clock.
2. in rugby and American football, to put the ball on the ground behind the opposite team's goal line (noun ˈtouch-down).
touch off
to make (something) explode. a spark touched off the gunpowder; His remark touched off an argument.
touch up
to improve eg paintwork, a photograph etc by small touches. The photograph had been touched up.
touch wood
(used as an interjection) to touch something made of wood superstitiously, in order to avoid bad luck. None of the children has ever had a serious illness, touch wood!
References in periodicals archive ?
In Ferguson-esque fashion, Dalglish touchily responded that the pressure was a figment of the interviewer's imagination, despite the question having been of the very same ilk Cates had put to Dalglish's arch-rival the previous month.
But the greatest difficulty of all was at once the most emotive and the most intangible: 'national honour', the ultimate rallying cry of patriots, nationalists and, as the kaiser touchily insisted, sovereign rulers.
The galleries now, for some reason, are watched over by seemingly inexperienced youngsters with identity cards on tapes around their necks: some casual in dress and manner, a few touchily egalitarian.