touchiness


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touch·y

 (tŭch′ē)
adj. touch·i·er, touch·i·est
1. Tending to take offense with slight cause; oversensitive.
2. Requiring special tact or skill in handling; delicate: a touchy situation.
3. Highly sensitive to touch. Used of a body part.
4. Easily ignited or exploded.

touch′i·ly adv.
touch′i·ness n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.touchiness - feeling easily irritatedtouchiness - feeling easily irritated    
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
حساسِيَة، سُرْعَة تأثُّر
vznětlivost
pirrelighed
fyrtni
alınganlık

touchiness

[ˈtʌtʃɪnɪs] Nsusceptibilidad f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

touchiness

nEmpfindlichkeit f (→ on in Bezug auf +acc); (= irritability also)leichte Reizbarkeit; because of the touchiness of this subjectweil dieses Thema so heikel ist
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

touchiness

[ˈtʌtʃɪnɪs] npermalosità f inv, suscettibilità f inv
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

touch

(tatʃ) verb
1. to be in, come into, or make, contact with something else. Their shoulders touched; He touched the water with his foot.
2. to feel (lightly) with the hand. He touched her cheek.
3. to affect the feelings of; to make (someone) feel pity, sympathy etc. I was touched by her generosity.
4. to be concerned with; to have anything to do with. I wouldn't touch a job like that.
noun
1. an act or sensation of touching. I felt a touch on my shoulder.
2. (often with the) one of the five senses, the sense by which we feel things. the sense of touch; The stone felt cold to the touch.
3. a mark or stroke etc to improve the appearance of something. The painting still needs a few finishing touches.
4. skill or style. He hasn't lost his touch as a writer.
5. (in football) the ground outside the edges of the pitch (which are marked out with ˈtouchlines). He kicked the ball into touch.
ˈtouching adjective
moving; causing emotion. a touching story.
ˈtouchingly adverb
in a moving way, so as to cause emotion. Her face was touchingly childlike.
ˈtouchy adjective
easily annoyed or offended. You're very touchy today; in rather a touchy mood.
ˈtouchily adverb
ˈtouchiness noun
ˈtouch screen noun
a computer screen that responds to the user's touch on its surface.
in touch (with)
in communication (with). I have kept in touch with my school-friends.
lose touch (with)
to stop communicating (with). I used to see him quite often but we have lost touch.
out of touch (with)
1. not in communication (with).
2. not sympathetic or understanding (towards). Older people sometimes seem out of touch with the modern world.
a touch
a small quantity or degree. The soup needs a touch of salt; a touch of imagination.
touch down
1. (of aircraft) to land. The plane should touch down at 2 o'clock.
2. in rugby and American football, to put the ball on the ground behind the opposite team's goal line (noun ˈtouch-down).
touch off
to make (something) explode. a spark touched off the gunpowder; His remark touched off an argument.
touch up
to improve eg paintwork, a photograph etc by small touches. The photograph had been touched up.
touch wood
(used as an interjection) to touch something made of wood superstitiously, in order to avoid bad luck. None of the children has ever had a serious illness, touch wood!
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
The princess had grown accustomed to this already with her other daughters, but now she felt that there was more ground for the prince's touchiness. She saw that of late years much was changed in the manners of society, that a mother's duties had become still more difficult.
"My touchiness about trifles, dear master and mistress."
But, if you be ashamed of your touchiness, you must ask pardon, mind, when she comes in.
There was a simplicity in the man which would have disarmed a touchiness even more youthful than mine.
The EU, conscious of the Polish government's touchiness about its rights, has long been cautious of confronting it on the judicial issue.
Second, there is an observed loss of energy, clear changes in appetite, difficulty sleeping or a marked change in sleeping patterns, anxiety, reduced concentration, restlessness, constant feelings of worthlessness (as opposed to the usual tampo or touchiness that we sometimes observe in the elderly), guilt or hopelessness and, most important, thoughts of self-harm or suicide.
Political observer Lao Mong Hay said that while the premier's health was a matter of public interest, his touchiness on the issue ensured there would be little clarity surrounding his wellbeing.
"Nothing, really." She's embarrassed by her own touchiness. "Stupidly I went to sign the petition--you know, about saving the port--and the woman at the table gave me a hard time.
It was another unedifying chapter in the long narrative of tetchiness, touchiness and tension between those who can and can't speak the language.
This movie's attitude is take it or leave it when it comes to human behavior, there's no middle ground or any individual trying to achieve a balance between vulnerability and touchiness. In simple words, this film tells us that either you have to shout at and dominate other people to get what you really want in life, or you'll just end up as live bait.
Some suspicion about a money matter or business deal could cause touchiness. Expect this to hamper your dealings with others at regular intervals during the day.
For that reason, character defects stemming from emotionality, such as "touchiness, dissatisfaction, sulking, weeping, an introverted state of mind, apathy, jealousy or anger," are encouraged by suggesting they are "emotions representing human nature." Nothing could be more wrong, however.