towelhead


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towel·head

 (tou′əl-hĕd′)
n. Offensive Slang
Used as a disparaging term for an Arab or other person from a culture in which turbans are worn.

towelhead

(ˈtaʊəlˌhɛd)
n
slang offensive an offensive term for someone who wears a turban
References in periodicals archive ?
Prior to 'The Magicians', Bishil was best known for the indie film drama Towelhead (2007).
Towelhead (2007), starring Aaron Eckhart and Toni Collette was originally a novel written by Arab-American Alicia Erian.
In "Loving in the Iraq War Years," which focuses on Alicia Erian's fiction, and especially her novel Towelhead (2005), Stuelke tracks how the War on Terror discourse of multiculturalism has enlisted the neoliberal logic of postfeminist desire that emerged from sex-positive feminism.
Through her analysis of Laila Halabi's West of the Jordan (2003) and Once in a Promised Land (2007), Alicia Erian's Towelhead (2005) and Frances Khiralla Noble's The New Belly Dancer of the Galaxy (2007), Bosch traces the evolution of the perception and re-presentation of Arab and Arab American masculinities in the aftermath of 9/11.
People keep writing and bragging about our freedoms--as compared with those lacking in towelhead land--but are these freedoms for real?
Then I read about a little movie called Towelhead and I thought, "Okay, that's very interesting; it's exactly what I was thinking.
Towelhead is based on a novel by Alicia Erian and tells the story of a young Arab-American girl set to a backdrop of the 1990 Gulf War.
Towelhead doesn't reflect that show's groundbreaking focus on gay relationships, but Jasira's father is played by actor Peter Macdissi (best known as Claire's bisexual art teacher, Olivier, on Six Feet Under).
The forms such explorations take are hardly predictable, as illustrated by three very different novels about young Arab-American women "coming of age": The Bullet Collection, by Patricia Sarrafian Ward; West of Jordan, by Laila Halaby; and Towelhead, by Alicia Erian.
Pakistan in an apparent effort to impress the vile Osama bin Laden, who hopes to bring a "judgmental" monotheism of his own to bear on these United States and is thus in some people's minds a sort of towelhead version of Ken Starr.
While Erian's early fiction dramatizes the affective experience of growing up in the aftermath of the Sex Wars, her novel Towelhead serves as dark commentary on the postfeminist imaginary of the War on Terror, revealing how racialized representations of postfeminist female sexual agency and freedom make ordinary the violence of US interventions in the Middle East--even as the ongoing US presence in the Middle East constitutes the condition of possibility for postfeminist self-making, self-management, intimacy, and sociality.