toxin-antitoxin


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tox·in-an·ti·tox·in

(tŏk′sĭn-ăn′tĭ-tŏk′sĭn)
n.
1. A pair of genes that encode a stable, toxic protein and a corresponding unstable antitoxin that is either a protein or RNA, found in many bacteria either on a plasmid or on the bacterial chromosome.
2. A mixture of a toxin and its antitoxin with a slight excess of toxin, formerly used as a vaccine.

toxin-antitoxin

n
(Pharmacology) a mixture of a specific toxin and antitoxin. The diphtheria toxin-antitoxin was formerly used in the US for active immunization
References in periodicals archive ?
In 1922, the Citizens Medical Reference Bureau published a pamphlet titled Protest Against Sending Nurses Into Homes of School Children to Urge Medical Treatment, and Against Using Public Schools to Promote the Schick Test, and Toxin-Antitoxin.
In 1913 German researcher Emil Behring first injected toxin-antitoxin into humans to create an immunity to diphtheria over time.
A strain of Corynebacterium ulcerans was subsequently isolated from the culture specimen at CDC, and toxin production by this strain was confirmed by a toxin-antitoxin precipitation assay (Elek test) and by PCR assay on the isolate.