toxocariasis


Also found in: Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to toxocariasis: toxoplasmosis

tox·o·ca·ri·a·sis

 (tŏk′sō-kə-rī′ə-sĭs)
n.
A disease caused by a parasitic nematode of the genus Toxocara, transmitted to humans by ingestion of a substance, such as soil, that has been contaminated by dog or cat feces and typically affecting either the eye or the internal organs. The ocular form of the disease can lead to permanent loss of vision.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

toxocariasis

(ˌtɒksəkəˈraɪəsɪs)
n
(Medicine) the infection of humans with the larvae of a genus of roundworms, Toxocara, of dogs and cats. It can cause swelling of the liver and, sometimes, damage to the eyes
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

toxocariasis

The infestation of humans by the worm toxocara canis, which lives in the intestines of dogs. It can infect and destroy the retina.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
Translations

toxocariasis

n toxocariasis f
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Given the cost implications of related biological investigations such as serology for syphilis, Lyme borreliosis, cat scratch disease, toxocariasis, cytomegalovirus, retrovirus, herpes simplex and zoster virus and rubella, these were not initially analyzed in the clinical context of our patient.
When the PSPO was first proposed, a council report warned of the risks of toxocariasis - which can cause serious illnesses in humans.
The exact underlying cause is not known, but some cases may be due to somatic mutations in the Norrie disease gene.[11] The patient is considered cured once the ocular manifestations are controlled and systemic treatment is unnecessary.[4] Clinically, the list of differential diagnosis of Coat's disease includes congenital or developmental cataract, retinoblastoma, persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous, and toxocariasis. Those diseases can be distinguished based on angiographic and histopathological findings.
Mrs Green warned children could be blinded if they touched contaminated soil that could contain toxocariasis, a dangerous parasite sometimes found in dog faeces.
A report by Cardiff council in the summer said dog fouling "can lead to serious illness in humans, such as toxocariasis, from direct contact with the faeces on the ground, which can also lead to blindness".
The council's report in June said dog fouling "can lead to serious illness in humans, such as toxocariasis, from direct contact with the faeces on the ground which can also lead to blindness".
(1) Ocular toxocariasis is frequently seen in children, although the reported prevalence is also rising in Asian adults in recent years.
Human toxocariasis is still considered a neglected disease as a result of the higher seroprevalences but a few resources dedicated to a preventable disease [41].
Parasites which thrive in dog faeces, such as toxocariasis, can cause serious illness and can even lead to blindness on rare occasions.