toyish

toyish

(ˈtɔɪɪʃ)
adj
1. resembling a toy
2. playful
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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The UI felt like a slight disconnect with a device that otherwise looked and felt quite premium - a toyish disconnect of the soul from the body.
Blunden describes Mansfield's verse as "thin metrical wanderings [...] chimerical, pallid and toyish" and he concludes that it is "not quite poetry" (609).
(9) And she went out wearing an "immodest" and toyish," tall-crowned copple hat ornamented with a "twined band," a head covering that merchants' wives and "yong Dames" had borrowed from men's fashions (Figure 6).
The brothers rekindled the argument when George charged Thomasine in a church meeting with wearing a "toyish hat" of velvet, and Francis responded that "it be not toyish in nature." George admitted that the hat was not "unlawful in the nature thereof," but she should not wear something that some might see as frivolous and wanton: "I condemne not velvets or silkes: but in you the Pastors wife, and in the poore banished estate of this remnant, such attire will open the adversaries mouth, discomforte the godly, discredit the ghospell, and dishonour God." Still, Francis argued that if the hat were not toyish in nature, then her wearing of it was not toyish.
From among any number of passages, Beecher himself selects the following, sententious conclusion as illustrative of the Overburian style of charactery: "to be brief with him, he is his own strength's enfeebler, his beauty's blemisher, his wit's blunder, his memory's decayer, and his appetite's abater--a toyish tobacconist" (49).
Despite their toyish appearance, these are the most brilliant and probably most deadly PGMs in the US arsenal.