TBT

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TBT

abbreviation for
(Elements & Compounds) tri-n-butyl tin: a biocide used in marine paints to prevent fouling
References in periodicals archive ?
The morphological pattern of the tracheobronchial tree is similar among the different species of cetaceans, confirming the phylogenetic relationships between these animals, which can be verified in Lipotes vexillifer, Platanista sp.
A highly sensitive cough reflex with afferent signals from larynx, trachea and proximal tracheobronchial tree also helps in preventing entry of any foreign body into the airway.
MEC of the lung is derived from minor salivary gland tissue of the tracheobronchial tree,[3] and was first described by Smetana in 1952.
While ligneous conjunctivitis is the best characterized lesion of plasminogen deficiency, hypoplasminogenemia is a multi-systemic disease that can also affect the ears, sinuses, tracheobronchial tree, genitourinary tract, and gingiva.
Histologically, these tumors are similar to those originally described in the major salivary glands and are believed to originate from the minor salivary glands lining the tracheobronchial tree.
Pulmonary sequestration is a cystic or solid mass that comprises of nonfunctioning primitive lung mass, does not communicate with the tracheobronchial tree and has anomalous systemic blood supply.
Objective: A foreign body aspiration in the tracheobronchial tree is a dangerous medical condition in the childhood period.
35-41) Of note, localized AL amyloidosis is not unique to the lungs and the tracheobronchial tree (see below).
This broad classification becomes important when considering obstruction to airflow, amount of mucosal reaction, inflammation/infection, and abscess formation akin to organic FBs in the tracheobronchial tree.
RP associated abnormalities include particularly the involvement of elastic cartilage of the ear and nose, hyaline cartilage of peripheral joints, and cartilage of tracheobronchial tree.
A special TT with the cuff positioned distal to the fistula may help to re-establish adequate ventilation and prevent soiling of the tracheobronchial tree.
If I were to take up pencil and sketch my fathers airways, to trace the microscopic surfaces of my father's tracheobronchial tree, the task would require fifteen hundred miles of graphite lines.