trackage


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track·age

 (trăk′ĭj)
n.
1. Railway tracks.
2.
a. The right of one railroad company to use the track system of another.
b. The charge for this right.

trackage

(ˈtrækɪdʒ)
n
a collective term for the railway tracks in general, or those in a given area or belonging to a particular company, etc

track•age

(ˈtræk ɪdʒ)

n.
1. the whole quantity of track owned by a railroad.
2. the right of one railroad company to use the tracks of another.
[1875–80, Amer.]

Trackage

 railway lines collectively, 1884.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Kansas City Southern confirmed that it has received the Final Resolution handed down by the Panel of the Mexican Economic Competition Commission, or COFECE, in connection with the investigation regarding effective competition in the market for interconnection services, trackage rights and switching rights used to provide railway freight public services in the rail freight industry.
According to statistics released by the China Urban Rail Transit Association, the Chinese urban rail trackage exceeded 5000km at the end of 2017.
and trackage rights over Metro-North Commuter Railroad, Amtrak and CSX Corp.
95), and extra width for construction of additional receiving and departure trackage.
Will a major rail carrier sell off the servicing trackage to a short line?
GTPR trains travelled from Melville up the GTPR's Canora Branch to Yorkton, where they transferred to CPR trackage, running to Portage la Prairie, where they reverted back to GTPR tracks on the run into Winnipeg.
The result is that PTC will likely be required on more than 70-90% of main line trackage within the U.
We've had, like most railroads, a number of smallish incidents, usually involving accidents in yard trackage and industry trackage," he told the CBC.
Those are mostly things like, for instance, the trackage at the Port of Little Rock," Laggan said.
And to make our railroad viable, we had to get trackage rights with Canadian Pacific.
Also, trackage enhancements in the 1980s and 1990s greatly increased the amount of coal from those mines that railroads could handle.