trade gap

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trade gap

n
(Economics) the amount by which the value of a country's visible imports exceeds that of visible exports; an unfavourable balance of trade
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.trade gap - the difference in value over a period of time of a country's imports and exports of merchandisetrade gap - the difference in value over a period of time of a country's imports and exports of merchandise; "a nation's balance of trade is favorable when its exports exceed its imports"
balance - the difference between the totals of the credit and debit sides of an account
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Philippines has been incurring wide trade gaps since 2017 amid a rise in imports to feed the Duterte administration's ambitious infrastructure program, reversing the nation's current account surplus to a deficit andpressuring the peso.
Trump entered office insisting that decades of trade gaps had crushed the U.S.
(http://www.ibtimes.co.uk/articles/457656/20130416/gold-prices-futures-india-imports.htm) India's trade gaps have averaged about $16bn a month in 2012 and about $13.5bn a month in 2011, a huge increase over the monthly average of $9.5bn between 2008 and 2010.
Wider trade gap the new norm economists !-- -- Lawrence Agcaoili (The Philippine Star) - January 13, 2019 - 12:00am MANILA, Philippines Wider trade gaps will likely be the norm for the Philippines over the medium term as the growth in the importation of capital equipment and raw materials to support the growing economy would continue to outpace the increase in exports, economists said.
" "With both the government and corporates doubling down on this capital-intensive growth, wide trade gaps arelikely tobethe norm in the medium term," said Nicholas Mapa, senior economist at ING Bank in Manila.