trademarked


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trade·mark

 (trād′märk′)
n.
1. Abbr. TM A name, symbol, or other device used to identify and promote a product or service, especially an officially registered name or symbol that is thereby protected against use by others.
2. A distinctive characteristic by which a person or thing comes to be known: the snicker that became the comedian's trademark.
tr.v. trade·marked, trade·mark·ing, trade·marks
1. To label (a product) with proprietary identification.
2. To register (something) as a trademark.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.trademarked - (of goods and merchandise) labeled with proprietary (and legally registered) identification guaranteeing exclusive usetrademarked - (of goods and merchandise) labeled with proprietary (and legally registered) identification guaranteeing exclusive use; "trademarked goods"
proprietary - protected by trademark or patent or copyright; made or produced or distributed by one having exclusive rights; "`Tylenol' is a proprietary drug of which `acetaminophen' is the generic form"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
While products and services can be duplicated, trademarked brands cannot.
In fact, per Majure, a trademarked hashtag could help brand owners protect their rights and protect themselves from possible infringement.
Having a trademark ensures that if another company begins using the same or "confusingly similar" name to your trademarked names, you can require them to stop.
Tiffany & Co.'s unique shade of the colour blue, as displayed on its packaging and boxes, is trademarked. Accordingly Tiffany & Co.
The verb obviously arose from the trademarked Google search engine, which over the past decade has become the dominant internet search engine, with 67% to 90% of the market share--depending on which survey you read.
The patent office said the slogan was not distinctive enough for it to be trademarked and is "merely laudatory and descriptive."
For example, Johnson & Johnson's trademarked Cypher stent should be referred to as, "The hospital would like to order 20 Cypher stents," and not as, "The hospital would like to order twenty Cyphers.