trader


Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to trader: stock trader

trad·er

 (trā′dər)
n.
1. One that trades; a dealer: a gold trader; a trader in bonds.
2. Nautical A ship employed in foreign trade.

trader

(ˈtreɪdə)
n
1. (Commerce) a person who engages in trade; dealer; merchant
2. (Nautical Terms) a vessel regularly employed in foreign or coastal trade
3. (Stock Exchange) stock exchange US a member who operates mainly on his or her own account rather than for customers' accounts
ˈtraderˌship n

trad•er

(ˈtreɪ dər)

n.
1. a merchant or businessperson.
2. a ship used in trade, esp. foreign trade.
3. a member of a stock exchange trading privately.
[1575–85]
trad′er•ship`, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.trader - someone who purchases and maintains an inventory of goods to be soldtrader - someone who purchases and maintains an inventory of goods to be sold
art dealer - a dealer in works of art requiring esthetic evaluation
barterer - a trader who exchanges goods and not money
bibliopole, bibliopolist - a dealer in secondhand books (especially rare or curious books)
cheesemonger - someone who sells cheese
barrow-boy, barrow-man, costermonger - a hawker of fruit and vegetables from a barrow
cutler - a dealer in cutlery
draper - a dealer in fabrics and sewing materials (and sometimes in clothing and drygoods)
fence - a dealer in stolen property
fishmonger, fishwife - someone who sells fish
horse trader - a hard bargainer
hardwareman, ironmonger - someone who sells hardware; "in England they call a hardwareman an ironmonger"
mercer - a dealer in textiles (especially silks)
merchandiser, merchant - a businessperson engaged in retail trade
seedman, seedsman - a dealer in seeds
slopseller, slop-seller - a dealer in cheap ready-made clothing
stamp dealer - a dealer in stamps (whose customers are stamp collectors)
stock trader - someone who buys and sells stock shares

trader

noun dealer, marketer, buyer, broker, supplier, merchant, seller, purveyor, merchandiser traders at the Stock Exchange

trader

noun
A person engaged in buying and selling:
Translations
تاجِر
-iceobchodník
handelsmand
kaupmaîur
trgovec

trader

[ˈtreɪdəʳ] Ncomerciante mf, negociante mf; (= street trader) → vendedor(a) m/f ambulante (Hist) → mercader m

trader

[ˈtreɪdər] ncommerçant(e) m/f, négociant(e) m/ftrade route nroute f de commercetrade secret nsecret m de fabrication

trader

n
(= person)Händler(in) m(f)
(= ship)Handelsschiff nt

trader

[ˈtreɪdəʳ] ncommerciante m/f

trade

(treid) noun
1. the buying and selling of goods. Japan does a lot of trade with Britain.
2. (a) business, occupation, or job. He's in the jewellery trade.
verb
1. (often with in or with) to buy and sell. They made a lot of money by trading; They trade in fruit and vegetables.
2. to exchange. I traded my watch for a bicycle.
ˈtrader noun
a person who trades.
ˈtrademark, ˈtradename nouns
an officially registered mark or name belonging to a particular company, and not to be used by anyone else, that is put on all goods made by the company.
ˈtradesman (ˈtreidz-) noun
1. a shopkeeper.
2. a workman in a skilled job. My husband cannot mend the television-set – I'll have to send for a tradesman.
trade(s) union
a group of workers of the same trade who join together to bargain with employers for fair wages, better working conditions etc.
trade(s) unionist a member of a trade(s) union (noun trade(s) unionism
).
trade wind
a wind that blows towards the equator (from the north-east and south-east).
trade in to give (something) as part-payment for something else: We decided to trade in our old car and get a new one ( noun ˈtrade-in)
References in classic literature ?
"Well, I've got just as much conscience as any man in business can afford to keep,--just a little, you know, to swear by, as 't were," said the trader, jocularly; "and, then, I'm ready to do anything in reason to 'blige friends; but this yer, you see, is a leetle too hard on a fellow--a leetle too hard." The trader sighed contemplatively, and poured out some more brandy.
Her dress was of the neatest possible fit, and set off to advantage her finely moulded shape;--a delicately formed hand and a trim foot and ankle were items of appearance that did not escape the quick eye of the trader, well used to run up at a glance the points of a fine female article.
The constant study of the rival bands is to forestall and outwit each other; to supplant each other in the good will and custom of the Indian tribes; to cross each other's plans; to mislead each other as to routes; in a word, next to his own advantage, the study of the Indian trader is the disadvantage of his competitor.
State of the fur trade of the Rocky Mountains American enterprises General Ashley and his associates Sublette, a famous leader Yearly rendezvous among the mountains Stratagems and dangers of the trade Bands of trappers Indian banditti Crows and Blackfeet Mountaineers Traders of the Far West Character and habits of the trapper
The schooner stopped at Santa Anna, and in the night Mauki swam ashore, where he stole two rifles and a case of tobacco from the trader and got away in a canoe to Cristoval.
The schooner went on, but the Moongleam trader ashore offered a thousand sticks, and to him Mauki was brought by the bushmen with a year and eight months tacked on to his account.
And so saying, he charged with levelled lance against the one who had spoken, with such fury and fierceness that, if luck had not contrived that Rocinante should stumble midway and come down, it would have gone hard with the rash trader. Down went Rocinante, and over went his master, rolling along the ground for some distance; and when he tried to rise he was unable, so encumbered was he with lance, buckler, spurs, helmet, and the weight of his old armour; and all the while he was struggling to get up he kept saying, "Fly not, cowards and caitiffs!
After he had gone about two miles Don Quixote perceived a large party of people, who, as afterwards appeared, were some Toledo traders, on their way to buy silk at Murcia.
Let there the trader rule, where all that still glittereth is--traders' gold.
--Verily, not to a nobility which ye could purchase like traders with traders' gold; for little worth is all that hath its price.
At their hospitable boards I occasionally met with partners, and clerks, and hardy fur traders from the interior posts; men who had passed years remote from civilized society, among distant and savage tribes, and who had wonders to recount of their wide and wild peregrinations, their hunting exploits, and their perilous adventures and hair-breadth escapes among the Indians.
John Jacob Astor, relative to that portion of our country, and to the adventurous traders to Santa Fe and the Columbia.