tragacanth


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Related to tragacanth: agar, guar gum

trag·a·canth

(trăg′ə-kănth′, trăj′-)
n.
1. Any of several spiny Asian shrubs of the genus Astragalus of the pea family, especially A. gummifer, of the Middle East, yielding a gum used in pharmaceuticals, adhesives, and textile printing, and as an emulsifier and thickener in foods.
2. The gum of any of these plants.

[Latin tragacantha, from Greek tragakantha : tragos, goat (probably from the resemblance of the drops of hardened gum to tiny goat horns in shape, color, and texture when they are collected off the plant); see tragic + akantha, thorn, spine.]

tragacanth

(ˈtræɡəˌkænθ)
n
1. (Plants) any of various spiny leguminous plants of the genus Astragalus, esp A. gummifer, of Asia, having clusters of white, yellow, or purple flowers, and yielding a substance that is made into a gum
2. (Plants) the gum obtained from any of these plants, used in the manufacture of pills and lozenges, etc
[C16: from French tragacante, from Latin tragacantha goat's thorn, from Greek tragakantha, from tragos goat + akantha thorn]

trag•a•canth

(ˈtræg əˌkænθ, ˈtrædʒ-)

n.
a gum of various Asian shrubs belonging to the genus Astragalus, of the legume family, used as a filler, as in pills, and to stiffen calico.
[1565–75; < Latin tragacantha goat's thorn < Greek tragákantha=trág(os) goat + ákantha thorn]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tragacanth - a gum used in pharmacy, adhesives, and textile printingtragacanth - a gum used in pharmacy, adhesives, and textile printing
gum - any of various substances (soluble in water) that exude from certain plants; they are gelatinous when moist but harden on drying
References in periodicals archive ?
In Iran, many spices are produced (saffron, cumin), root crops (licorice), medicinal and gum-bearing (tragacanth, ferula stinky and gum-bearing) plants that are mainly exported are cultivated.
[USPRwire, Wed Nov 14 2018] Tragacanth is widely used as a stabilizing, viscosity enhancing agent in food emulsions.
Regarding the written parchments, pigments or colorant mixed with vegetal gum (arabic gum, cherry tree gum, and tragacanth gum) or egg white or egg yolk was used to produce red and blue inks.
Bases usually consist of water, glycerol, or propylene glycol gelled with tragacanth, starch, cellulose derivatives, carboxyvinyl polymers, or Mg Al silicates.
Kaya and Kar [13] used waste expanded polystyrene (EPS) in a mixture of cement and tragacanth resin to produce a new concrete material.
The basic component of denture adhesives is the adhesive itself which can be plant gums (karaya, tragacanth) or polymers, both natural (carboxymethyl cellulose) and synthetic (polyvinyl acetate).2,9 In a previous study done on experienced denture wearers it was found that retention of their dentures was much better (87% and 37%) using either of denture adhesive pastes based on polymers (either natural or synthetic).6
Texture of low-fat Iranian white cheese as influenced by gum tragacanth as a fat replacer.
yellow myrobalan; one dirham of socotra aloe; rose and tragacanth,
For example, blend fibers of poly(e-caprolactone)(PCL) and gum tragacanth (GT) were loaded with curcumin (Cur) (up to 24wt%) as a dressing material to provide antioxidant, antitumurogenic, and anti-inflammatory ability [66, 67].
Amiryousefi, "Physicochemical Properties of Bell Pepper and Kinetics of Its Color Change Influenced by Aloe vera and Gum Tragacanth Coatings during Storage at Different Temperatures," Journal of Food Processing and Preservation, vol.
Tragacanth gum was added to demineralized water in a ratio 1: 30 (w/w) and left to swell in a mucilaginous suspension.
Mastic gum, carrageenan, xanthan gum, guar gum, gum tragacanth, locust bean gum, and [beta]-glucan were purchased from Sigma Aldrich (Saint Louis, MO, USA).