tragic flaw

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tragic flaw

n.
A flaw in the character of the protagonist of a tragedy that brings the protagonist to ruin or sorrow.

tragic flaw

n
(Theatre) a failing of character in the hero of a tragedy that brings about his downfall

trag′ic flaw′


n.
a character defect that causes the downfall of the protagonist of a tragedy.
[1950–55]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tragic flaw - the character flaw or error of a tragic hero that leads to his downfalltragic flaw - the character flaw or error of a tragic hero that leads to his downfall
flaw - defect or weakness in a person's character; "he had his flaws, but he was great nonetheless"
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References in periodicals archive ?
24) Kaplan presents them, especially Petraeus, as heroes with tragic flaws.
As is expected with teen romance, Monroe and Nathan are beautiful people with tragic flaws.
The choices made by the gentile men and the Jewish women are like tragic flaws in drama.
The principal, Orlando Gober, an inspiring black man of incredible strengths and some tragic flaws, is at the center of the tale.
Ultimately, it's these same tragic flaws that make Earth's surface so fit for life.
Kennedy still doesn't emerge as a very positive figure, and among the substantial, even tragic flaws the narrative ascribes to him are a failure to see the implications of Nazi ideology, and overemphasis on an economic view of international relations, a failure to acknowledge the importance of maintaining a balance of power in European politics, an inability to recognize "the intangible aspects of spirit that would allow Britain and democracy to triumph in war," a tendency to confuse his own point of view with that of the United States, and a propensity for reckless behavior in both his professional and personal life.
Not all readers will agree that Germaine's selfishness, or Leopold's and Marie Lou's inability to communicate, constitute tragic flaws, and one wishes that this section had been followed by a discussion of the many comic elements in the plays.
Furthermore, the system that goes under the name of ethnic politics and ethnic federalism (in Ethiopia the majority ethnic groups like the Oromos and Amaras number close to 20m each), the problems caused by an inability to pursue a comprehensive economic and social development policy, the dependence on foreign aid, and the tragic flaws of state ownership of land that has prevailed in Ethiopia since the seventies, should all be addressed.