trailing


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Related to trailing: Trailing zeros, Trailing 12 Months

trail

 (trāl)
v. trailed, trail·ing, trails
v.tr.
1. To allow to drag or stream behind, as along the ground: The dog ran off, trailing its leash.
2. To drag (the body, for example) wearily or heavily.
3.
a. To follow the traces or scent of, as in hunting; track.
b. To follow the course taken by; pursue: trail a fugitive.
4. To follow behind: several cruisers trailed by an escorting destroyer.
5. To lag behind (an opponent): trailed the league leader by four games.
v.intr.
1. To drag or be dragged along, brushing the ground: The queen's long robe trailed behind.
2. To extend, grow, or droop loosely over a surface: vines trailing through the garden.
3. To drift in a thin stream: smoke trailing from a dying fire.
4. To become gradually fainter; dwindle: His voice trailed off in confusion.
5. To walk or proceed with dragging steps; trudge: trailed along in glum silence.
6. To be behind in competition; lag: trailing by two goals in the second period.
n.
1.
a. A marked or beaten path, as through woods or wilderness.
b. An overland route: the pioneers' trail across the prairies.
c. A marked course through one or more bodies of water, as for recreational boaters or divers.
2.
a. A mark, trace, course, or path left by a moving body.
b. The scent of a person or animal: The dogs lost the trail of the fox.
3. Something that is drawn along or follows behind; a train: The mayor was followed by a trail of reporters.
4. A succession of things that come afterward or are left behind: left a trail of broken promises.
5. Something that hangs loose and long: Trails of ticker tape floated down from office windows.
6. The part of a gun carriage that rests or slides on the ground.
7. The act of trailing.

[Middle English trailen, probably from Old French trailler, to hunt without a foreknown course, from Vulgar Latin *trāgulāre, to make a deer double back and forth, perhaps alteration (influenced by Latin trāgula, dragnet) of Latin trahere, to pull, draw.]

trailing

(ˈtreɪlɪŋ)
adj
(Botany) (of a plant) having a long stem which spreads over the ground or hangs loosely: trailing ivy.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.trailing - the pursuit (of a person or animal) by following tracks or marks they left behindtrailing - the pursuit (of a person or animal) by following tracks or marks they left behind
animal, animate being, beast, creature, fauna, brute - a living organism characterized by voluntary movement
chase, pursual, pursuit, following - the act of pursuing in an effort to overtake or capture; "the culprit started to run and the cop took off in pursuit"
Translations

trailing

[ˈtreɪlɪŋ] ADJ [plant] → trepador; [branches] → colgante
she wore a long trailing scarfllevaba un pañuelo largo que le colgaba
trailing edge (Aer) → borde m de salida, borde m posterior

trailing

adj
(Bot) → hängend; trailing plantHängepflanze f
(Aviat) trailing edgeHinterkante f, → Achterkante f
References in classic literature ?
Not a very splendid show, but there was a great deal of love done up in the few little bundles, and the tall vase of red roses, white chrysanthemums, and trailing vines, which stood in the middle, gave quite an elegant air to the table.
Off they started through the jungle, trailing after the impetuous professor who was intent on capturing the iguana.
Why, you King-Post, you, I suppose you would have every man in the world go about with a small lightning-rod running up the corner of his hat, like a militia officer's skewered feather, and trailing behind like his sash.
Great, tall, raw-boned Kentuckians, attired in hunting-shirts, and trailing their loose joints over a vast extent of territory, with the easy lounge peculiar to the race,--rifles stacked away in the corner, shot-pouches, game-bags, hunting-dogs, and little negroes, all rolled together in the corners,--were the characteristic features in the picture.