trained nurse


Also found in: Thesaurus, Wikipedia.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.trained nurse - someone who has completed the course of study (including hospital practice) at a nurses training schooltrained nurse - someone who has completed the course of study (including hospital practice) at a nurses training school
nurse - one skilled in caring for young children or the sick (usually under the supervision of a physician)
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

trained nurse

n. enfermero-a graduado-a.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in classic literature ?
She marched out of the door and closed it behind her, and there to her great astonishment she found the trained nurse standing as if she had been listening and, more amazing still--she was laughing.
They've a trained nurse and everything's been done.
I think when I grow up I'll be a trained nurse and go with the Red Crosses to the field of battle as a messenger of mercy.
Doctors from town, and a trained nurse, and enough medicine to kill a dog.
Judge Scott's suggestion of a trained nurse was indignantly clamoured down by the girls, who themselves undertook the task.
Behind the doctor, a young man (a trained nurse from the nearest city) gave a disturbed exclamation.
Under ordinary circumstances, after all that I had undergone, I should have been fit for bed and a trained nurse.
But I had Raffles with me, and his hand was as steady and as cool as the hand of a trained nurse. That I know because he turned up the collar of my overcoat for me, for some reason, and buttoned it at the throat.
He had surrounded her with doctors, trained nurses, massage-women, and even faith-cure companions, but they were useless.
A History of Industrial and Occupational Health Nurses in New South Wales provides a detailed history of the role of the occupational health nurse: what we know today as the registered nurse and previously known as a nursing sister or trained nurse. It describes three distinct eras of occupational health nursing in New South Wales: the early years (1911-1939), wartime and after (1940-1959) and the rise and fall (1960 onwards).
That the nurse is the distrusted and unsuspecting new woman is arresting in Newman's writing, and may be the key to why in southern literature the trained nurse is often ignored or treated as anomalous.
As a trained nurse and a patient, I found this idea so good for patients and a worry less for nurses, to know that your patient was clean, fed and relaxed, to be with someone they knew.