tramcar


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tram·car

 (trăm′kär′)
n.
1. Chiefly British A streetcar.
2. A wagon or car used on a tramway in a mine, as to carry coal or ore .
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tramcar - a four-wheeled wagon that runs on tracks in a minetramcar - a four-wheeled wagon that runs on tracks in a mine; "a tramcar carries coal out of a coal mine"
waggon, wagon - any of various kinds of wheeled vehicles drawn by an animal or a tractor
2.tramcar - a wheeled vehicle that runs on rails and is propelled by electricitytramcar - a wheeled vehicle that runs on rails and is propelled by electricity
horsecar - an early form of streetcar that was drawn by horses
self-propelled vehicle - a wheeled vehicle that carries in itself a means of propulsion
trolley line - a transit line using streetcars or trolley buses
Britain, Great Britain, U.K., UK, United Kingdom, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland - a monarchy in northwestern Europe occupying most of the British Isles; divided into England and Scotland and Wales and Northern Ireland; `Great Britain' is often used loosely to refer to the United Kingdom
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
kaivosvaunu
električka
References in classic literature ?
After drinking some hot coffee, like an Arctic explorer setting off on a sledge journey towards the North Pole, I would go ashore and roll shivering in a tramcar into the very heart of the town, past clean-faced houses, past thousands of brass knockers upon a thousand painted doors glimmering behind rows of trees of the pavement species, leafless, gaunt, seemingly dead for ever.
From afar at the end of Tsar Peter Straat, issued in the frosty air the tinkle of bells of the horse tramcars, appearing and disappearing in the opening between the buildings, like little toy carriages harnessed with toy horses and played with by people that appeared no bigger than children.
Notwithstanding the little iron stove, the ink froze on the swing- table in the cabin, and I found it more convenient to go ashore stumbling over the arctic waste-land and shivering in glazed tramcars in order to write my evening letter to my owners in a gorgeous cafe in the centre of the town.
The tramcar became entangled in their ranks, and moved on painfully, like a caterpillar in a swarm of ants.
Where was the clang of tramcar gongs, the screech of motor horns, the vast murmur of a dense throng?
I helped these ladies into the tramcar and they asked me to call in the afternoon.
I suggested that he had better take the next city- ward tramcar. He was inattentive, and I perceived that he was profoundly perturbed.
"Did you know that the law forbids females of any age to ride on the top of omnibuses or tramcars?"
On that day the tramcar was carrying 50 passengers, many of whom were holidaymakers who had been to the summit of the Great Orme to enjoy the bracing air and views.
In the period July - September, the enterprises of the urban electric transport (tramway, trolley and metro) in total transported 58 906 thousand passengers or 7 051 thousand passengers less than the same period of the previous year due to the drop in tramcar services.
Although street tramways were introduced to Newcastle and Gateshead between 1879 and 1884, there was no electric tramcar link between the two until 1923, although there were horsedrawn buses which ran until 1931.
1917 : The Examiner reported on an 'alarming' tramway accident on the Ainleys when the West Vale tramcar crashed into horse and waggon laden with iron girders.