transcendentalism


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tran·scen·den·tal·ism

 (trăn′sĕn-dĕn′tl-ĭz′əm)
n.
1. often Transcendentalism A literary and philosophical movement arising in 19th-century New England, associated with Ralph Waldo Emerson and Margaret Fuller and asserting the existence of an ideal spiritual reality that transcends empirical and scientific reality and is knowable through intuition.
2. The quality or state of being transcendental.

tran′scen·den′tal·ist n.

transcendentalism

(ˌtrænsɛnˈdɛntəˌlɪzəm)
n
1. (Philosophy)
a. any system of philosophy, esp that of Kant, holding that the key to knowledge of the nature of reality lies in the critical examination of the processes of reason on which depends the nature of experience
b. any system of philosophy, esp that of Emerson, that emphasizes intuition as a means to knowledge or the importance of the search for the divine
2. (Philosophy) vague philosophical speculation
3. the state of being transcendental
4. something, such as thought or language, that is transcendental
ˌtranscenˈdentalist n, adj

tran•scen•den•tal•ism

(ˌtræn sɛnˈdɛn tlˌɪz əm, -sən-)

n.
1. transcendental character, thought, or language.
2. Also called transcenden′tal philos′ophy. any philosophy based upon the doctrine that the principles of reality are to be discovered by the study of the processes of thought, or a philosophy emphasizing the intuitive and spiritual above the empirical: in the U.S., associated with Emerson.
[1795–1805; < German Transcendentalismus. See transcendental, -ism]
tran`scen•den′tal•ist, n., adj.

transcendentalism

1. any philosophy based upon the doctrine that the principles of reality are to be discovered only through the analysis of the processes of thought, as Kantianism.
2. a philosophy emphasizing the intuitive and spiritual above the empirical, as the philosophy of Emerson. Cf. descendentalism.transcendentalist, n.transcendentalistic, adj.
See also: Philosophy
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.transcendentalism - any system of philosophy emphasizing the intuitive and spiritual above the empirical and materialtranscendentalism - any system of philosophy emphasizing the intuitive and spiritual above the empirical and material
philosophy - the rational investigation of questions about existence and knowledge and ethics
Translations

transcendentalism

[ˈtrænsenˈdentlɪzəm] Ntrascendentalismo m

transcendentalism

ntranszendentale Philosophie, Transzendentalismus m
References in classic literature ?
There is another sort of progress from the general notions of Socrates, who asked simply, 'what is friendship?' 'what is temperance?' 'what is courage?' as in the Lysis, Charmides, Laches, to the transcendentalism of Plato, who, in the second stage of his philosophy, sought to find the nature of knowledge in a prior and future state of existence.
"Blessed be nothing" and "The worse things are, the better they are" are proverbs which express the transcendentalism of common life.
Transcendentalism has its occasional vagaries (what school has not?), but it has good healthful qualities in spite of them; not least among the number a hearty disgust of Cant, and an aptitude to detect her in all the million varieties of her everlasting wardrobe.
Transcendentalism is a beacon to the angels, even if it be a will-o'-the-wisp to man.
Dr Hirsch, though born in France and covered with the most triumphant favours of French education, was temperamentally of another type--mild, dreamy, humane; and, despite his sceptical system, not devoid of transcendentalism. He was, in short, more like a German than a Frenchman; and much as they admired him, something in the subconsciousness of these Gauls was irritated at his pleading for peace in so peaceful a manner.
These fellows demonstrate a hidden meaning in "The Antediluvians," a parable in Powhatan," new views in "Cock Robin," and transcendentalism in "Hop O' My Thumb." In short, it has been shown that no man can sit down to write without a very profound design.
A humanist, incorporating transcendentalism and realism in his works.
Among the topics are a preliminary overview of the genealogy of philosophy/zhexue in China 1888-1930, philosophy in the clothes of history: the case of the Book of the Later Han (Han Hanshu, New Confucianism and the sinicization of metaphysics and transcendentalism: conceptualizations of philosophy in the early works of Xiong Shili and Mou Zongsan, Kukai's philosophy of language: reflections on the usage of the word philosophy, and towards a critical public sphere: Tosaka Jun on philosophical journalism and journalistic philosophy.
Synopsis: American Transcendentalism is often seen as a literary movement, a flowering of works written by New England intellectuals who retreated from society and lived in nature.
Corrington, Deep Pantheism: Toward a New Transcendentalism
"When the individual learns how to listen to the soul, there can be no limit to his goodness and ability to help the larger community," reads the signage at the Fruitlands Museum, regarding the awakening of transcendentalism. Among the leading figures in this movement were Bronson Alcott, Margaret Fuller, Henry David Thoreau, and Ralph Waldo Emerson, each of whom gathered in Concord, the epicenter of American literature in the mid-19th-century.
The social, intellectual, and aesthetic milieu of American transcendentalism shaped a movement of abstract art across North America, seen in the paintings of Georgia O'Keeffe, Marsden Hartley, Katherine Dreier, Raymond Jonson, and Lawren Harris.