transducer

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trans·duc·er

 (trăns-do͞o′sər, -dyo͞o′-, trănz-)
n.
1. Physics A substance or device, such as a piezoelectric crystal, microphone, or photoelectric cell, that converts input energy of one form into output energy of another.
2. Biology Something, such as a receptor in a cell membrane, that transmits a signal within a cell or from the exterior of a cell to its interior.

[From Latin trānsdūcere, to transfer : trāns-, trans- + dūcere, to lead; see deuk- in Indo-European roots.]

transducer

(trænzˈdjuːsə)
n
(Electronics) any device, such as a microphone or electric motor, that converts one form of energy into another
[C20: from Latin transducere to lead across, from trans- + ducere to lead]

trans•duc•er

(trænsˈdu sər, -ˈdyu-, trænz-)

n.
a device, as a microphone, that converts a signal from one form of energy to another.

trans·duc·er

(trăns-do͞o′sər)
A device that converts one type of energy into another. For example, the transducer in a microphone converts sound waves into electric impulses, while the transducer in a loudspeaker converts electrical impulses into sound waves.

transducer

A device that converts one kind of wave signal into another.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.transducer - an electrical device that converts one form of energy into anothertransducer - an electrical device that converts one form of energy into another
electrical device - a device that produces or is powered by electricity
electro-acoustic transducer - a transducer that converts electrical to acoustic energy or vice versa
mosaic - transducer formed by the light-sensitive surface on a television camera tube
electric eye, magic eye, photocell, photoconductive cell, photoelectric cell - a transducer used to detect and measure light and other radiations
Translations

transducer

[trænzˈdjuːsəʳ] Ntransductor m

transducer

nUmformer m, → Umwandler m

transducer

[trænzˈdjuːsəʳ] ntrasduttore m

trans·du·cer

n. transductor, dispositivo que convierte una forma de energía a otra.
References in periodicals archive ?
A bank of transduced epidermal stem cells taken at birth could be used to treat skin lesions while they develop, thus preventing, rather than restoring, the devastating clinical manifestation that arise in these patients.
This book reviews elastomeric materials that display a smart response, as they respond to external stimuli through a macroscopic output in which the energy of the stimulus is transduced appropriately as a function of external interference.
At the administered dose of 1E+12 vg/mL vector concentration, editing levels exceeded levels predicted to be therapeutically relevant in 90 percent (27/30) of EDIT-101 treated eyes with a median of 31 percent of photoreceptors harboring productively edited CEP290 in the transduced neuroretina.
For this study, the manufacturing process by which the patient's cells are transduced with the LentiGlobin viral vector has been improved, with the intent of increasing vector copy number and the % age of cells successfully transduced.
Hearing in insects has evolved 16 separate times, meaning that nature has come up with a wide range of subtly different mechanisms by which 9M sound waves can be transduced into nerve signals.
The signal-conditioning path for each sensor is implemented with analogue circuits and in relation to the corresponding transduced signal.
In June 2016, GlaxoSmithKline, Fondazione Telethon and Ospedale San Raffaele gained European Commission approval for Strimvelis (autologous CD34+ cells transduced to express ADA), the first ex-vivo stem cell gene therapy to treat patients with severe combined immunodeficiency due to adenosine deaminase deficiency (ADA-SCID).
The restoration of enzymatic activities of transduced fusion protein into cells is critical for the application of protein transduction technology or therapeutic use.
Both companies have completed a series of in vitro experiments that indicated that stem cells transduced with ddRNAi-expression constructs produce exosomes that are effective at delivering expressed shRNAs to target cancer cells and to knock down a specific gene in those cells.
The scientists used their array of tests to determine which of the transduced cells met the necessary requirements for stemness--the characteristics of a stem cell that distinguish it from a regular cells--and safety.
The presence of GFP allowed the number of cells that had become successfully transduced to be determined.
The transduced signal can be transmitted in several ways such as direct transmission through cables, optical fiber, or wirelessly.