transfer RNA


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transfer RNA

n. Abbr. tRNA
Any of a class of RNA molecules that transport amino acids to ribosomes for incorporation into a polypeptide undergoing synthesis.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

transfer RNA

n
(Biochemistry) biochem any of several soluble forms of RNA of low molecular weight, each of which transports a specific amino acid to a ribosome during protein synthesis. Sometimes shortened to: t-RNA Also called: soluble RNA See also messenger RNA, genetic code
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

transfer RNA



n.
any of a class of small, cloverleaf forms of RNA that transfer unattached amino acids in the cell cytoplasm to the ribosomes for protein synthesis.
Abbr.: tRNA
[1960–65]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

trans·fer RNA

(trăns′fər)
See under RNA.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.transfer RNA - RNA molecules present in the cell (in at least 20 varieties, each variety capable of combining with a specific amino acid) that attach the correct amino acid to the protein chain that is being synthesized at the ribosome of the cell (according to directions coded in the mRNA)transfer RNA - RNA molecules present in the cell (in at least 20 varieties, each variety capable of combining with a specific amino acid) that attach the correct amino acid to the protein chain that is being synthesized at the ribosome of the cell (according to directions coded in the mRNA)
ribonucleic acid, RNA - (biochemistry) a long linear polymer of nucleotides found in the nucleus but mainly in the cytoplasm of a cell where it is associated with microsomes; it transmits genetic information from DNA to the cytoplasm and controls certain chemical processes in the cell; "ribonucleic acid is the genetic material of some viruses"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The structural gene organization is quite conserved within vertebrate mitogenome which contains 13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes (12S and 16S), 22 transfer RNA genes and one noncoding control region.
developed a proprietary test that could quickly identify chemical compounds with the potential to inhibit HIV's reproduction by targeting the virus's use of transfer RNA. The test is a biochemical test that does not use living cells; its value is in its ability to quickly narrow down the universe of thousands of potential compounds into a small number of "hits" worth pursuing.
The discoveries center on a cloverleaf-shaped molecule called transfer RNA (tRNA), a key player in translation.
Transfer RNA would then bring over amino acids that correspond with the code and finally, ribosomal RNA would collectively make the proteins from multiple amino acids.
They believe that control over fragments of transfer RNA molecules may halt the spread of deadly fever.
Transfer RNA (tRNA) serves as an adaptor molecule in protein synthesis, and translates mRNA codons into amino acids.
According to transcriptomic and bioinformatics studies, there are thousands of ncRNAs classified into different categories based on their functions and lengths including transfer RNA (tRNA), ribosomal RNA (rRNA), microRNA (miRNA), and long ncRNA (lncRNA) to name a few [1-3].
Standard curves were prepared with 10-, 5-, or 2-fold (depending on abundance of target) serial dilutions of C10 cDNA, diluted into 100 ng/[micro]L yeast transfer RNA (tRNA) (Life Technologies).
OK, but we also know that translation requires not only the ribozyme, but also the set of encoded protein enzymes that each properly load the appropriate transfer RNA with the "right" amino acid to that tRNA such that via its anticodon site it then binds to the "right" nucleotide triplet codon for the "right" amino acid for that position in the forming protein.
Post-transcriptional RNA modifications are present in many types of RNAs including ribosomal RNA (rRNA), messenger RNA (mRNA), transfer RNA (tRNA), and others.