transfinite number


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transfinite number

n.
1. A transfinite cardinal number.
2. A transfinite ordinal number.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

transfinite number

n
(Mathematics) a cardinal or ordinal number used in the comparison of infinite sets for which several types of infinity can be classified: the set of integers and the set of real numbers have different transfinite numbers.
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in classic literature ?
"Unless it were a transfinite number falling in love with a finite one--I suppose such things do happen, even in mathematics."
The group of real numbers represents a higher infinity, a transfinite number. Furthermore, all real numbers correspond to the points in a line, so that points are also nondenumerable.
Even so, he spent much of his later life addressing ancient and scholastic objections to his own transfinite number theory.
(47) Here [omega] denotes the smallest transfinite number which Cantor conceived of as the least upper bound of the progression of integers, as expressed in the second principle of generation.
If aleph-n is a small transfinite number, then so is aleph-(n + 1).
Borges proposes a clear explanation of Russell's lesson about the transfinite numbers in "El tiempo" (Borges oral).
Through the rest of chapter 3, Maddalena further explicates thought's continuity using tools from mathematics, following the lead of Peirce, who famously appreciated Cantor's controversial discovery of transfinite numbers, attempting to engage the brilliant schoolteacher in argument about the greatest infinity.
This applies both to cosmological phenomena such as singularities, which are often considered bodies of infinite mass and density, and to "inventions" such as Cantor's system of transfinite numbers. (44)
(I understood Cantor's theory of transfinite numbers and was sure that Korzybski didn't.) Korzybski identified sanity with the mode of thinking that evolved in the natural sciences and in mathematics, and so did Bertrand Russell (if "sanity" is taken as a synonym of "rationality-cum-morality"), and so did Hayakawa (if pragmatism is assumed to be the psychological substrate of sanity).
Acting out of obedience to carry out his understanding of God's will, Cantor developed a theory of transfinite numbers. It was vigorously opposed by well-known mathematicians such as Leopold Kronecker, who, like Brouwer, was an Intuitionist (see Section 1.1, Logic).
"Such a study would embrace the mutual relationships of the continuous and discontinuous, the real meaning of surds [irrational numbers] and transfinite numbers, the infinitesimal, non-Euclidean space, and the validity of mathematical transcripts of physical reality such as quantum mechanics and the theory of relativity" (12-13).