transgression


Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

trans·gres·sion

 (trăns-grĕsh′ən, trănz-)
n.
1. A violation of a law, principle, or duty. See Synonyms at breach.
2. The exceeding of due bounds or limits.
3. A relative rise in sea level resulting in deposition of marine strata over terrestrial strata.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

transgression

(trænzˈɡrɛʃən)
n
1. (Law) a breach of a law, etc; sin or crime
2. the act or an instance of transgressing
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

trans•gres•sion

(trænsˈgrɛʃ ən, trænz-)

n.
an act of transgressing; violation of a law, command, etc.; sin.
[1400–50; late Middle English < Latin trānsgressiō the act of going across, derivative of trānsgred(ī) (see transgress)]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.transgression - the act of transgressingtransgression - the act of transgressing; the violation of a law or a duty or moral principle; "the boy was punished for the transgressions of his father"
actus reus, wrongful conduct, misconduct, wrongdoing - activity that transgresses moral or civil law; "he denied any wrongdoing"
abomination - an action that is vicious or vile; an action that arouses disgust or abhorrence; "his treatment of the children is an abomination"
evil, wickedness, immorality, iniquity - morally objectionable behavior
villainy - a criminal or vicious act
turpitude, depravity - a corrupt or depraved or degenerate act or practice; "the various turpitudes of modern society"
vice - a specific form of evildoing; "vice offends the moral standards of the community"
sinning, sin - an act that is regarded by theologians as a transgression of God's will
terrorisation, terrorization - an act of terrorism
crime, criminal offence, criminal offense, law-breaking, offense, offence - (criminal law) an act punishable by law; usually considered an evil act; "a long record of crimes"
crime - an evil act not necessarily punishable by law; "crimes of the heart"
inside job - some transgression committed with the assistance of someone trusted by the victim; "the police decided that the crime was an inside job"
2.transgression - the spreading of the sea over land as evidenced by the deposition of marine strata over terrestrial stratatransgression - the spreading of the sea over land as evidenced by the deposition of marine strata over terrestrial strata
geological phenomenon - a natural phenomenon involving the structure or composition of the earth
3.transgression - the action of going beyond or overstepping some boundary or limit
action - something done (usually as opposed to something said); "there were stories of murders and other unnatural actions"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

transgression

Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

transgression

noun
An act or instance of breaking a law or regulation or of nonfulfillment of an obligation or promise, for example:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

transgression

[trænsˈgreʃən] Ntransgresión f, infracción f (Rel) → pecado m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

transgression

[trænzˈgrɛʃən] ntransgression f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

transgression

n
(of law)Verstoß m, → Verletzung f, → Überschreitung f
(= sin)Sünde f, → Verstoß m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in classic literature ?
It struck me like a blow, this proof of premeditated transgression and systematic disregard of truth.
As for Goldoni himself, he apparently never dreams of transgression; he is of rather an explicit conventionality in most things, and he deals with society as something finally settled.
But either his success, or the frequency of the transgression in others, soon wiped off this slight stain from his character; and, although there were a few who, dissatisfied with their own fortunes, or conscious of their own demerits, would make dark hints concerning the sudden prosperity of the unportioned Quaker, yet his services, and possibly his wealth, soon drove the recollection of these vague conjectures from men’s minds.
For a moment all were touched, and there was disposi- tion to deal mercifully with her, seeing that she was so young and friendless, and her case so piteous, and the law that robbed her of her support to blame as being the first and only cause of her transgression; but the prosecuting officer replied that whereas these things were all true, and most pitiful as well, still there was much small theft in these days, and mistimed mercy here would be a danger to property -- oh, my God, is there no property in ruined homes, and orphaned babes, and broken hearts that British law holds precious!
I am concerned but for the good name of the Tremolino, and I affirm that a ship is ever guiltless of the sins, transgressions, and follies of her men.
Lady Russell, in spite of all her former transgressions, he could now value from his heart.
And when he finds that the sum of his transgressions is great he will many a time like a child start up in his sleep for fear, and he is filled with dark forebodings.
The coins abstracted and the missive written, he could not be gone too soon from the scene of these transgressions; and remembering how his father had once returned from church, on some slight illness, in the middle of the second psalm, he durst not even make a packet of a change of clothes.
Remember Thy bounteous mercy and loving-kindness which are from of old; turn not Thy face from us, but be gracious to our unworthiness, and in Thy great goodness and Thy many mercies regard not our transgressions and iniquities!
They were of the most curious character: odd transgressions that I never imagined previously.
Rebecca sat down heavily in her chair as she heard the list of her transgressions. How could she have been so careless?
Girls are such geese sometimes, I can't help it," said Steve, confessing his transgressions handsomely, and feeling quite ready to atone for them if he only knew how.