transitive


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Related to transitive: transitive verb, Transitive dependency

transitive and intransitive verbs

English verbs are split into two major categories depending on how they function in a sentence: transitive and intransitive. Transitive verbs take one or more objects in a sentence, while intransitive verbs take no objects in a sentence.
Put simply, a transitive verb describes an action that is happening to something or someone, which is known as the verb’s direct object.
An intransitive verb, on the other hand, describes an action that does not happen to something or someone.
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tran·si·tive

 (trăn′sĭ-tĭv, -zĭ-)
adj.
1. Abbr. trans. or tr. or t. Grammar Expressing an action carried from the subject to the object; requiring a direct object to complete meaning. Used of a verb or verb construction.
2. Characterized by or involving transition.
3. Logic & Mathematics Of or relating to a binary relation such that, whenever one element is related to a second element and the second element is related to a third element, then the first element is also related to the third element. Examples of transitive relations are "less than" for real numbers (a < b and b < c implies a < c) and divisibility for integers (a divides b and b divides c mean that a divides c).
n. Grammar
A transitive verb.

[Late Latin trānsitīvus, passing over (translation of Greek diabibastikos), from trānsitus, past participle of trānsīre, to go over; see transient.]

tran′si·tive·ly adv.
tran′si·tive·ness, tran′si·tiv′i·ty n.

transitive

(ˈtrænsɪtɪv)
adj
1. (Grammar) grammar
a. denoting an occurrence of a verb when it requires a direct object or denoting a verb that customarily requires a direct object: 'to find' is a transitive verb.
b. (as noun): these verbs are transitives.
2. (Grammar) grammar denoting an adjective, such as fond, or a noun, such as husband, that requires a noun phrase and cannot be used without some implicit or explicit reference to such a noun phrase
3. (Logic) logic maths having the property that if one object bears a relationship to a second object that also bears the same relationship to a third object, then the first object bears this relationship to the third object: mathematical equality is transitive, since if x = y and y = z then x = z.
[C16: from Late Latin transitīvus from Latin transitus a going over; see transient]
ˈtransitively adv
ˌtransiˈtivity, ˈtransitiveness n

tran•si•tive

(ˈtræn sɪ tɪv, -zɪ-)

adj.
1. of or designating a verb that is accompanied by a direct object and from which a passive can be formed, as deny, put, or elect.
2. characterized by or involving transition; transitional.
n.
3. a transitive verb.
[1550–60; < Late Latin trānsitīvus= Latin trānsit(us), past participle of trānsīre to cross (see transit) + -īvus -ive]
tran′si•tive•ly, adv.
tran′si•tive•ness, tran`si•tiv′i•ty, n.

transitive

Used to describe a verb that has a direct object. Compare intransitive.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.transitive - a verb (or verb construction) that requires an object in order to be grammatical
verb - the word class that serves as the predicate of a sentence
doubly transitive verb, doubly transitive verb form - a transitive verb that takes both a direct and an indirect object
Adj.1.transitive - designating a verb that requires a direct object to complete the meaning
grammar - the branch of linguistics that deals with syntax and morphology (and sometimes also deals with semantics)
intransitive - designating a verb that does not require or cannot take a direct object
Translations
přechodnýtranzitivní
transitiv
prijelazantranzitivan
tárgyas
áhrifs-
galininkinistranzityvinis
transitīvs, pārejošs
przechodni
transitiv
geçişlinesne alan

transitive

[ˈtrænzɪtɪv] ADJtransitivo
transitive verbverbo m transitivo

transitive

[ˈtrænzɪtɪv] adj [verb] → transitif/ive

transitive

adjtransitiv; transitive verbtransitives Verb, Handlungsverb nt, → Transitiv(um) nt

transitive

[ˈtrænzɪtɪv] adj (Gram) → transitivo/a

transitive

(ˈtrӕnsitiv) adjective
(of a verb) having an object. He hit the ball; Open the door!
References in classic literature ?
For all symbols are fluxional; all language is vehicular and transitive, and is good, as ferries and horses are, for conveyance, not as farms and houses are, for homestead.
As depicted in the example above, transitive and equivalence relations in an equivalence class can have the same nodal number (i.e., 1-node AC and CA relations and 2-node AD and DA relations).
Constructing a transitive signature scheme for directed graphs still remains an open problem.
55), the form is to be analyzed as [tu]r(root)+u(TRANSITIVE)+t(PLURAL)+i(JUSSIVE)+ni+ne(ENCLITIC PRONOUN).
A norm [parallel] x [parallel] on a Hilbert space H is order inclusion transitive on CC(H) if given any A,B [member of] CC(H) with [mathematical expression not reproducible] (i.e., if b is the point in B closet to x and a is the point in A closest to b then a is the point in A closest to x).
In this paper, we investigate a new extension of the transitive closure concept: "the transitive closure according to a given property." That is, for a given property P, and a relation R, we are interested in computing the smallest transitive relation containing R such that the property P holds.
A dynamical system (X, F) is topologically transitive if and only if, for all nonempty subsets U and V of X, there exist n positive such that the iteration of F on U intersects V at least at a point.
They both used the transitive property by equating 1/2 to 4/8 and then concluding that 3/8 is less than 1/2 because 3/8 is less than 4/8.
The most frequent word order in the language is AOV for transitive clauses.
Distance transitive digraphs, Discrete Mathematics, Vol.
THE TRANSITIVE AND INTRANSITIVE DIMENSIONS OF PRAXIS IN THE CONSTITUTION OF CULTURE
Kemmer (1993: 16-21) characterizes particular groups of middle verbs which are frequently equipped with specific morphology in languages of the world and considers middle verb clauses as a transitory link between fully elaborated transitive event structures with articulated agentive participants (typically accompanied by patient participants) and typical mono-argumental intransitives with a non-affected subject argument.