transitivity


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tran·si·tive

 (trăn′sĭ-tĭv, -zĭ-)
adj.
1. Abbr. trans. or tr. or t. Grammar Expressing an action carried from the subject to the object; requiring a direct object to complete meaning. Used of a verb or verb construction.
2. Characterized by or involving transition.
3. Logic & Mathematics Of or relating to a binary relation such that, whenever one element is related to a second element and the second element is related to a third element, then the first element is also related to the third element. Examples of transitive relations are "less than" for real numbers (a < b and b < c implies a < c) and divisibility for integers (a divides b and b divides c mean that a divides c).
n. Grammar
A transitive verb.

[Late Latin trānsitīvus, passing over (translation of Greek diabibastikos), from trānsitus, past participle of trānsīre, to go over; see transient.]

tran′si·tive·ly adv.
tran′si·tive·ness, tran′si·tiv′i·ty n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.transitivity - (logic and mathematics) a relation between three elements such that if it holds between the first and second and it also holds between the second and third it must necessarily hold between the first and third
math, mathematics, maths - a science (or group of related sciences) dealing with the logic of quantity and shape and arrangement
logic - the branch of philosophy that analyzes inference
logical relation - a relation between propositions
mathematical relation - a relation between mathematical expressions (such as equality or inequality)
2.transitivity - the grammatical relation created by a transitive verb
grammatical relation - a linguistic relation established by grammar
intransitiveness, intransitivity - the grammatical relation created by an intransitive verb
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

transitivity

[ˌtrænsɪˈtɪvɪtɪ] Ntransitividad f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

transitivity

[ˌtrænzɪˈtɪvəti] ntransitivité ftransit lounge nsalle f de transit
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

transitivity

Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in periodicals archive ?
General Overview Training involved two sets of conditional relations (three three-member classes in each set), followed by equivalence tests (transitivity and symmetry), using the arbitrary MTS manual-observing procedure (Hamasaki, 2009; see Fig.
The Biblical Hebrew Transitivity Alternation in Cognitive Linguistic Perspective
All such theories face objections concerning apparent failures of the transitivity of the "same MOP" relation.
FREE | Request Sample Copy is Available @ https://www.mrrse.com/sample/16945 Anti-reflective solar panel coatings are likely to witness huge demand during the forecast period, as they provide excellent absorption capacity and light transitivity, while reducing reflection of incident radiations.
Devaney has one of the most popular and accepted definitions of chaos in which such systems must exhibit sensitive dependence to initial conditions, topological transitivity, and dense periodic orbits [2].
Transitivity: Transitivity specifies the different types of processes that are recognized in the language and the structures by which they are expressed, says Halliday (1985: 101).
Devaney (2000) provides a more rigorous definition of chaos which essentially boils down to: (a.) sensitivity to initial conditions, (b.) topological transitivity, and (c.) countably infinite periodic points of all periods.
In fact (and in contrast to the paintings' appearance of languid transitivity), Hubbard had very little time to work before the urethane substances hardened irrevocably, producing a ground that, when cured, would regulate the composition; at this point, alterations could be effected only as new layers.