transitoriness


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Related to transitoriness: impermanence

tran·si·to·ry

 (trăn′sĭ-tôr′ē, trăn′zĭ-)
adj.
Existing or lasting only a short time; short-lived or temporary: "the disorder of his life: the succession of cities, of transitory loves" (Carson McCullers).

[Middle English transitorie, from Old French transitoire, from Late Latin trānsitōrius, from Latin, having a passageway, from trānsitus, passage; see transit.]

tran′si·to′ri·ly adv.
tran′si·to′ri·ness n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.transitoriness - an impermanence that suggests the inevitability of ending or dyingtransitoriness - an impermanence that suggests the inevitability of ending or dying
impermanence, impermanency - the property of not existing for indefinitely long durations
fugaciousness, fugacity - the lack of enduring qualities (used chiefly of plant parts)
ephemerality, ephemeralness, fleetingness - the property of lasting for a very short time
References in classic literature ?
He was one of the few people who was acutely conscious of the transitoriness of life, and how necessary it was to make the most of it.
In these English farms, if anywhere, one might see life steadily and see it whole, group in one vision its transitoriness and its eternal youth, connect--connect without bitterness until all men are brothers.
All material prosperity, and the modification of merely external structures would be meaningless, especially in the light of the transitoriness of earthly realities, without that inner relationship of each person with God and reference to man's eternal destiny.
However, while some similarities can be found in the manner in which Bunkse and Laretei convey a feeling at home on various landscapes of the world, Otsekui tolkes frequently foregrounds transitoriness and mobility as the perspective through which landscapes and places are perceived.
For 'Primavera,' Villamor uses flowers as visual metaphors connoting transitoriness, delicacy, fragility and vitality
(6) He also rejects the idea of a singular great work capable of containing and exhausting this truth, thus anticipating Matei Calinescu's characterization of modernism as "a major cultural shift from a time-honored aesthetics of permanence, based on a belief in an unchanging and transcendent ideal of beauty, to an aesthetics of transitoriness and immanence, whose central values are change and novelty" (3).
The sense here is of transitoriness of life, including exhibits, and the permanence of memory
The title of the exhibition relates to a rubai by Azerbaijani poet Mahsati Ganjavi (12th century, born in Ganja) that talks about the impermanence, transitoriness and ephemerally of all existing things.
For example, he refers in passing to "the poetic trade in general and what it involves: careerism, fashion, fame, obscurity, integrity, contamination, factionalism, camaraderie, intrigue, transitoriness, failure."
This consolation is located against the backdrop provided by the process commonplace that the real root of tragedy is not found in the conflict between good and evil (although this conflict is real enough and the source of much grief), but in the transitoriness of contingent good.
63) has termed "the denigration of the masses"--carried with it the general complaints: accusations of marginality, transitoriness, pure rhetoric, vagueness, manipulation, and so forth.
Robert Solomon's words are very well suited to this discussion; he points out, "In the face of tragedy and in view of the human potential which at its best always allows for: (i) turning suffering into a human achievement and accomplishment; (ii) deriving from guilt the opportunity to change oneself for the better; and (iii) deriving from life's transitoriness an incentive to take responsible action.68