transmundane


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trans·mun·dane

 (trăns′mŭn-dān′, trănz′-, trăns-mŭn′dān′, trănz-)
adj.
Existing or extending beyond the physical world.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

transmundane

(trænzˈmʌndeɪn)
adj
beyond this world or worldly considerations
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.transmundane - existing or extending beyond the physical worldtransmundane - existing or extending beyond the physical world; "whatever of transmundane...insight...we may carry"- William James
supernatural - not existing in nature or subject to explanation according to natural laws; not physical or material; "supernatural forces and occurrences and beings"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The idea to participate in a transmundane world giving reality to the objective world inhabited by man is a platonian idea revealed for the archaic man.
In the first instance, Gnosis provides the adept with the intuitive recognition of his being, as Exodus 2:22 has it, "a stranger in a strange land" (the World) and of having been placed in this absurd, inexplicable Universe through a complex series of transmundane events which had their origin before Time (2).
In this Gandavyuha worldview, the Dharma realm is held to be imminent in phenomena, a hierarchically arranged spiritual elite infiltrates and mimics the structures of ordinary human society, and the elite individual simultaneously occupies a particular and local form body (rupakoya), and a transmundane dharma body (dharmakaya).
By painting in the luminous colours of this world the beauty of men and things and transmundane happiness, it has planted real longing alongside poor consolation and false consecration in the soil of bourgeois life.
Early in his career, Muir looked for divine intervention, either via a "transmundane furnace" or, in a reference to the Garden of Eden, "a wall of fire to fence such gardens" (Writings 1: 359; 2: 95).
The momentary bliss experienced by Red under the charm of the Duettino "Sull'aria" attests to the utopian emancipating potential of opera: Red goes through what Dolar calls "a direct elevation into a transmundane world" (that is, "a place of transcendence and utopian reconciliation") by the combined forces of drama and music (Dolar and Zizek 2002, 7).
When Voegelin says that Christ was not "a man, moving in the struggle of the metaxy toward immortality" he means that, "as far as consciousness is the site of participation, its reality partakes of both the divine and the human without being wholly the one or the other," (39) which would entail that Christ could not be "true God and true man" but rather something ineffable in-between "mundane humanity and something transmundane." (40) A man in this "not quite human,...not quite divine" tension is neither the "mortal man" in the Homeric sense, nor an immortal god, but "a new kind of man," that Plato calls the daimonios aner, which Voegelin translates as a "spiritual man," the man who dwells fully in the metaxy as he is filled with divine presence.
It further describes the superhuman and transmundane character of the Buddha, especially with reference to the Pali canons.
Using category theory, Badiou tries to forge a 'Grand Logic' able to account for the specificity of worlds and the local apparition of events, without abandoning his doctrine of the transmundane nature of truths.