transmutation

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trans·mu·ta·tion

 (trăns′myo͞o-tā′shən, trănz′-)
n.
1.
a. The act or an instance of transmuting; transformation.
b. The state of being transmuted.
2. Physics Transformation of one element into another by one or a series of nuclear reactions.
3. The supposed conversion of base metals into gold or silver in alchemy.

trans′mu·ta′tion·al, trans·mut′a·tive (-myo͞o′tə-tĭv) adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

transmutation

(ˌtrænzmjuːˈteɪʃən)
n
1. the act or an instance of transmuting
2. (Elements & Compounds) the change of one chemical element into another by a nuclear reaction
3. (Alchemy) the attempted conversion, by alchemists, of base metals into gold or silver
ˌtransmuˈtational, transˈmutative adj
ˌtransmuˈtationist n, adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

trans•mu•ta•tion

(ˌtræns myuˈteɪ ʃən, ˌtrænz-)

n.
1. the act or process of transmuting.
2. the fact or state of being transmuted.
3. the transformation of one species into another.
4. any process in which a nuclide is transformed into a different nuclide, usu. one of a different element.
5. (in alchemy) the conversion of base metals into metals of greater value, esp. into gold or silver.
[1350–1400; Middle English transmutacio(u)n (< Old French transmutation) < Latin trānsmūtātiō a changing, shifting, derivative of trānsmūtā(re) (see transmute)]
trans•mut′a•tive (-ˈmyu tə tɪv) adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

trans·mu·ta·tion

(trăns′myo͞o-tā′shən)
The changing of one chemical element into another. Transmutations occur naturally through radioactive decay, or artificially by bombarding the nucleus of a substance with subatomic particles.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

transmutation

the process or act of change, especially from one thing to another, as the change from base metal to gold, pursued by the alchemists. — transmutationist, n.transmutative, adj.
See also: Alchemy
the process or act of change, especially from one thing to another, as the change from base metal to gold, pursued by the alchemists. — transmutationist, n. — transmutative, adj.
See also: Change
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.transmutation - an act that changes the form or character or substance of somethingtransmutation - an act that changes the form or character or substance of something
conversion - the act of changing from one use or function or purpose to another
2.transmutation - a qualitative changetransmutation - a qualitative change      
alteration, change, modification - an event that occurs when something passes from one state or phase to another; "the change was intended to increase sales"; "this storm is certainly a change for the worse"; "the neighborhood had undergone few modifications since his last visit years ago"
betterment, improvement, advance - a change for the better; progress in development
population shift - a change in the relative numbers of the different groups of individuals making up a population
pyrolysis - transformation of a substance produced by the action of heat
sea change - a profound transformation
sublimation - (chemistry) a change directly from the solid to the gaseous state without becoming liquid
tin disease, tin pest, tin plague - the transformation of ordinary white tin into powdery grey tin at very cold temperatures
changeover, conversion, transition - an event that results in a transformation
retrogression, degeneration - passing from a more complex to a simpler biological form
strengthening - becoming stronger
weakening - becoming weaker
3.transmutation - (physics) the change of one chemical element into another (as by nuclear decay or radioactive bombardment); "the transmutation of base metals into gold proved to be impossible"
natural philosophy, physics - the science of matter and energy and their interactions; "his favorite subject was physics"
alteration, change, modification - an event that occurs when something passes from one state or phase to another; "the change was intended to increase sales"; "this storm is certainly a change for the worse"; "the neighborhood had undergone few modifications since his last visit years ago"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

transmutation

noun
The process or result of changing from one appearance, state, or phase to another:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

transmutation

[ˌtrænzmjuːˈteɪʃən] Ntransmutación f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

transmutation

nVerwandlung f, → Umwandlung f; (Biol) → Umbildung f, → Transmutation f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

trans·mu·ta·tion

n. transmutación.
1. transformación, cambio evolutivo;
2. cambio de una sustancia en otra.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The works seem magical or transmutational: Trees reflected on the water and turned vertically become a torso in Maya Venus (all works 2018).
He sharply delineates the similarities and differences between Wallace's and Darwin's transmutational thinking leading up to 1859.
Thirdly, that Locke, like Boyle and Hooke, practised speculative natural philosophy and that, like Boyle, he favoured the corpuscularian hypothesis (that matter consisted of small sub-microscopic particles) and mercurialist transmutational chymistry (derived from Paracelsus, Van Helmont, and the alchemical tradition as opposed to the Galenic theory of the humours).
The first treatise is a standard treatment of transmutational ideas, while the second is a somewhat more original foray into medical alchemy, which anticipates ideas in modern pharmacology.