transpiration


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transpiration

tran·spi·ra·tion

 (trăn′spə-rā′shən)
n.
The act or process of transpiring, especially through the stomata of plant tissue or the pores of the skin.

tran′spi·ra′tion·al adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

tran•spi•ra•tion

(ˌtræn spəˈreɪ ʃən)

n.
1. an action or instance of transpiring.
2. the passage of water through a plant from the roots through the vascular system to the atmosphere.
[1545–55; trans- + Latin spīrātiō breathing =spīrā(re) to breathe + -tiōn- -tion]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

tran·spi·ra·tion

(trăn′spə-rā′shən)
The process of giving off vapor containing water and waste products, especially through the stomata on leaves or the pores of the skin.
Did You Know? Plants need much more water than animals do. But why? Plants use water not only to carry nutrients throughout their tissues, but also to exchange gases with the air in the process known as transpiration. Air, which contains the carbon dioxide that plant cells need for photosynthesis, enters the plant mainly through the stomata (tiny holes under its leaves). The air travels through tiny spaces in the leaf tissue to the cells that conduct photosynthesis. These cells are coated with a thin layer of water. The cell walls do not permit gases to pass through them, but the carbon dioxide can move across the cell walls by dissolving in the water on their surface. The cells remove the carbon dioxide from the water and use the same water to carry out oxygen, the main waste product of photosynthesis. All this mixing of water and air in transpiration, though, has one drawback: more than 90 percent of the water that a plant's roots suck up is lost by evaporation through the stomata. This is why a plant always needs water and why plants that live in dry climates, such as cacti, have reduced leaf surfaces from which less water can escape.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

transpiration

Evaporation of water from leaves.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.transpiration - the passage of gases through fine tubes because of differences in pressure or temperature
natural action, natural process, action, activity - a process existing in or produced by nature (rather than by the intent of human beings); "the action of natural forces"; "volcanic activity"
2.transpiration - the process of giving off or exhaling water vapor through the skin or mucous membranestranspiration - the process of giving off or exhaling water vapor through the skin or mucous membranes
bodily function, bodily process, body process, activity - an organic process that takes place in the body; "respiratory activity"
3.transpiration - the emission of water vapor from the leaves of plantstranspiration - the emission of water vapor from the leaves of plants
biological process, organic process - a process occurring in living organisms
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

transpiration

[ˌtrænspɪˈreɪʃən] Ntranspiración f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

transpiration

n (Anat) → Schweißabsonderung f, → Transpiration f; (Bot) → Transpiration f, → Ausdunstung f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

transpiration

[ˌtrænspɪˈreɪʃn] ntraspirazione f
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

tran·spi·ra·tion

n. transpiración, perspiración.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
It describes crop yield and its underlying processes; radiation, greenhouse cover, and temperature; the properties of humid air and the physics of air treatment; ventilation and mass balance; crop transpiration and humidity in greenhouses; crop response to environmental factors; heating in climate-controlled greenhouses; cooling and dehumidification; supplementary lighting; carbon dioxide supply; managing the shoot environment; root zone management; and vertical farms.
Pumpex Models K103 and K153 wastewater pumps for trouble-free diverting and re-routing of high volume or intermittent volume flow to by-pass deteriorating sewer lines, coffer dams, streams and creeks with out interrupting surface transpiration during by-pass replacement and repair.
It was discovered that, when planting trees in tight soil formations, it is important to score, aerate, or otherwise loosen the soils surrounding the borehole to allow for optimal root growth and development and to maximize transpiration rates.
Bulkcargomovements' facilitytothenearestrail headsofthekeycustoms pointslikeBiratnagar, Nepalgunj and Bhairahawa is expected to narrow down the cost of transpiration of bulk cargo.
Second, they cause stomata to partly close, thereby reducing the water loss due to transpiration." This second effect allows plants to adapt to and flourish in drier conditions featuring higher ambient temperatures.
During transpiration the wall adherent gas bubbles expand, and during refilling they contract.
Munns (2005) claims that inhibition of growth in plants under salinity occurs because of two reasons: the first one is related to the osmotic effect caused by salinity, which reduces water absorption, and the second one is due to the specific effect or the excess of the ions, which enter the transpiration flow and eventually cause damages to the leaves, reducing growth or negatively influencing the absorption of essential elements.
Water wisely Early morning and late evening are the best times of day to allow water enough time to soak into the soil before the sun's heat rises and speeds up evaporation and transpiration.