transpiration

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transpiration

tran·spi·ra·tion

 (trăn′spə-rā′shən)
n.
The act or process of transpiring, especially through the stomata of plant tissue or the pores of the skin.

tran′spi·ra′tion·al adj.

tran•spi•ra•tion

(ˌtræn spəˈreɪ ʃən)

n.
1. an action or instance of transpiring.
2. the passage of water through a plant from the roots through the vascular system to the atmosphere.
[1545–55; trans- + Latin spīrātiō breathing =spīrā(re) to breathe + -tiōn- -tion]

tran·spi·ra·tion

(trăn′spə-rā′shən)
The process of giving off vapor containing water and waste products, especially through the stomata on leaves or the pores of the skin.
Did You Know? Plants need much more water than animals do. But why? Plants use water not only to carry nutrients throughout their tissues, but also to exchange gases with the air in the process known as transpiration. Air, which contains the carbon dioxide that plant cells need for photosynthesis, enters the plant mainly through the stomata (tiny holes under its leaves). The air travels through tiny spaces in the leaf tissue to the cells that conduct photosynthesis. These cells are coated with a thin layer of water. The cell walls do not permit gases to pass through them, but the carbon dioxide can move across the cell walls by dissolving in the water on their surface. The cells remove the carbon dioxide from the water and use the same water to carry out oxygen, the main waste product of photosynthesis. All this mixing of water and air in transpiration, though, has one drawback: more than 90 percent of the water that a plant's roots suck up is lost by evaporation through the stomata. This is why a plant always needs water and why plants that live in dry climates, such as cacti, have reduced leaf surfaces from which less water can escape.

transpiration

Evaporation of water from leaves.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.transpiration - the passage of gases through fine tubes because of differences in pressure or temperature
natural action, natural process, action, activity - a process existing in or produced by nature (rather than by the intent of human beings); "the action of natural forces"; "volcanic activity"
2.transpiration - the process of giving off or exhaling water vapor through the skin or mucous membranestranspiration - the process of giving off or exhaling water vapor through the skin or mucous membranes
bodily function, bodily process, body process, activity - an organic process that takes place in the body; "respiratory activity"
3.transpiration - the emission of water vapor from the leaves of plantstranspiration - the emission of water vapor from the leaves of plants
biological process, organic process - a process occurring in living organisms
Translations

transpiration

[ˌtrænspɪˈreɪʃən] Ntranspiración f

transpiration

n (Anat) → Schweißabsonderung f, → Transpiration f; (Bot) → Transpiration f, → Ausdunstung f

transpiration

[ˌtrænspɪˈreɪʃn] ntraspirazione f

tran·spi·ra·tion

n. transpiración, perspiración.
References in periodicals archive ?
Thus, a char-forming resin acts as a self-regulating ablation radiator, providing thermal protection through transpirational cooling and insulation.
Rice is more susceptible to drought than other cereals due to its inability to regulate its transpirational water loss, a weakness that may accelerate rice blast attack (Kato et al.
Stomatal closure is one of the first responses to water deficit to prevent transpirational water loss.
Water deficit accelerates the biosynthesis of abscisic acid (ABA) which decreases the stomatal conductance to lessen the transpirational losses.
Transpirational drying has been proven to be an effective means of reducing MC in this type of material, and it could remain in its original form, on-site, for a few days to achieve a significant reduction in moisture.
2006), the plant undergoes stress because its absorption occurs at rates lower than those of the transpirational demand.
Likewise, floral overheating in hot climates can be damaging so transpirational cooling becomes crucial to minimize it (Patino & Grace, 2002; Galen, 2005).
Taller seedlings have the advantage of being able to compete more successfully with weeds, and their sizes may indicate higher genetic; however, plants with larger transpirational areas can suffer more from water stress, mainly before the full establishment of their root systems after transplanting (HAASE, 2008).
Leaf gas exchange measurements offer direct and often robust information on plant physiological condition and genetic variability, namely in terms of plants photosynthetic and transpirational activity under water stress situations (Long & Bernacchi, 2003).
The first real hot weather of the season puts a strain on the damaged vascular system, and the new shoots collapse when their transpirational loss of water exceeds the ability of their impaired vascular system to transport water.
Our results indicate that the transpirational cooling potential of vegetation in urban street canyons and on buildings can contribute to the cooling of outdoor urban air temperatures and constitutes a valuable contribution to the challenge of adapting cities to climate change.