transubstantiate

(redirected from transubstantial)
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tran·sub·stan·ti·ate

 (trăn′səb-stăn′shē-āt′)
tr.v. tran·sub·stan·ti·at·ed, tran·sub·stan·ti·at·ing, tran·sub·stan·ti·ates
1. To change (one substance) into another; transmute.
2. Christianity To change the substance of (the Eucharistic bread and wine) into the body and blood of Jesus.

[Medieval Latin trānsubstantiāre, trānsubstantiāt- : Latin trāns-, trans- + Latin substantia, substance; see substance.]

transubstantiate

(ˌtrænsəbˈstænʃɪˌeɪt)
vb
1. (Roman Catholic Church) (intr) RC theol (of the Eucharistic bread and wine) to undergo transubstantiation
2. (tr) to change (one substance) into another; transmute
[C16: from Medieval Latin transsubstantiāre, from Latin trans- + substantia substance]
ˌtransubˈstantial adj
ˌtransubˈstantially adv

tran•sub•stan•ti•ate

(ˌtræn səbˈstæn ʃiˌeɪt)

v.t. -at•ed, -at•ing.
1. to change from one substance into another; transmute.
2. (in the Eucharist) to cause (the substance of the bread and wine) to undergo transubstantiation.
[1400–50; late Middle English (adj.) < Medieval Latin trānssubstantiātus, past participle of trānssubstantiāre. See trans-, substance, -ate1]
tran`sub•stan′tial, adj.
tran`sub•stan′tial•ly, adv.

transubstantiate


Past participle: transubstantiated
Gerund: transubstantiating

Imperative
transubstantiate
transubstantiate
Present
I transubstantiate
you transubstantiate
he/she/it transubstantiates
we transubstantiate
you transubstantiate
they transubstantiate
Preterite
I transubstantiated
you transubstantiated
he/she/it transubstantiated
we transubstantiated
you transubstantiated
they transubstantiated
Present Continuous
I am transubstantiating
you are transubstantiating
he/she/it is transubstantiating
we are transubstantiating
you are transubstantiating
they are transubstantiating
Present Perfect
I have transubstantiated
you have transubstantiated
he/she/it has transubstantiated
we have transubstantiated
you have transubstantiated
they have transubstantiated
Past Continuous
I was transubstantiating
you were transubstantiating
he/she/it was transubstantiating
we were transubstantiating
you were transubstantiating
they were transubstantiating
Past Perfect
I had transubstantiated
you had transubstantiated
he/she/it had transubstantiated
we had transubstantiated
you had transubstantiated
they had transubstantiated
Future
I will transubstantiate
you will transubstantiate
he/she/it will transubstantiate
we will transubstantiate
you will transubstantiate
they will transubstantiate
Future Perfect
I will have transubstantiated
you will have transubstantiated
he/she/it will have transubstantiated
we will have transubstantiated
you will have transubstantiated
they will have transubstantiated
Future Continuous
I will be transubstantiating
you will be transubstantiating
he/she/it will be transubstantiating
we will be transubstantiating
you will be transubstantiating
they will be transubstantiating
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been transubstantiating
you have been transubstantiating
he/she/it has been transubstantiating
we have been transubstantiating
you have been transubstantiating
they have been transubstantiating
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been transubstantiating
you will have been transubstantiating
he/she/it will have been transubstantiating
we will have been transubstantiating
you will have been transubstantiating
they will have been transubstantiating
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been transubstantiating
you had been transubstantiating
he/she/it had been transubstantiating
we had been transubstantiating
you had been transubstantiating
they had been transubstantiating
Conditional
I would transubstantiate
you would transubstantiate
he/she/it would transubstantiate
we would transubstantiate
you would transubstantiate
they would transubstantiate
Past Conditional
I would have transubstantiated
you would have transubstantiated
he/she/it would have transubstantiated
we would have transubstantiated
you would have transubstantiated
they would have transubstantiated
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.transubstantiate - change (the Eucharist bread and wine) into the body and blood of Christtransubstantiate - change (the Eucharist bread and wine) into the body and blood of Christ
Christian religion, Christianity - a monotheistic system of beliefs and practices based on the Old Testament and the teachings of Jesus as embodied in the New Testament and emphasizing the role of Jesus as savior
transform, transmute, transubstantiate - change or alter in form, appearance, or nature; "This experience transformed her completely"; "She transformed the clay into a beautiful sculpture"; "transubstantiate one element into another"
2.transubstantiate - change or alter in form, appearance, or naturetransubstantiate - change or alter in form, appearance, or nature; "This experience transformed her completely"; "She transformed the clay into a beautiful sculpture"; "transubstantiate one element into another"
alter, change, modify - cause to change; make different; cause a transformation; "The advent of the automobile may have altered the growth pattern of the city"; "The discussion has changed my thinking about the issue"
transubstantiate - change (the Eucharist bread and wine) into the body and blood of Christ
sorcerise, sorcerize - transform or change by means of sorcery
stalinise, stalinize - transform in accordance with Stalin's policies; "Russia was slowly stalinized after Lenin's death"
destalinise, destalinize - counteract the effects and policies of Stalinism; "Russia was slowly destalinized in the late 1950's"
work on, work, process - shape, form, or improve a material; "work stone into tools"; "process iron"; "work the metal"

transubstantiate

verb
To change into a different form, substance, or state:
Translations

transubstantiate

[ˌtrænsəbˈstænʃɪeɪt] VTtransubstanciar

transubstantiate

vt (Rel) → verwandeln
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Moten does not turn to the traditionally sanctioned repositories of poetic value but rather works through the lyric presence of African American vernacular: "when he ready to get up and do his thing, when he wants to get into it, man, it's paramilitary// theory." Moten's lyrical address, in a sense still complying with being overheard, stands as one of his most noticeable traits, yoking his theoretical sophistication to his musicality: "we pound plenty, baby, softened in our program, our transubstantial fade and crossfade bodies, baby." This is also where Moten's political project takes its roots, in the articulation of an ageless tradition that finds its present in African American forms of sociality.
He talks about the objects of communion "being substantial or transubstantial in the pre-Lutheran understanding of the word" (125).
In 2.3 of 1 Henry VI, for example, "the Countess of Auvergne, who captures Talbot, plays the role of ironic hostess when she serves him "cates and wine" off stage that remind Elizabethan audiences of the affective experience of "Catholic, transubstantial communion" through their absence.