transubstantiation


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Related to transubstantiation: consubstantiation

tran·sub·stan·ti·a·tion

 (trăn′səb-stăn′shē-ā′shən)
n.
1. Conversion of one substance into another.
2. In many Christian churches, the doctrine holding that the bread and wine of the Eucharist are transformed into the body and blood of Jesus, although their appearances remain the same.

tran′sub·stan′ti·a′tion·al·ist n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

transubstantiation

(ˌtrænsəbˌstænʃɪˈeɪʃən)
n
1. (Roman Catholic Church) (esp in Roman Catholic theology)
a. the doctrine that the whole substance of the bread and wine changes into the substance of the body and blood of Christ when consecrated in the Eucharist
b. the mystical process by which this is believed to take place during consecration. Compare consubstantiation
2. a substantial change; transmutation
ˌtransubˌstantiˈationalist n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

tran•sub•stan•ti•a•tion

(ˌtræn səbˌstæn ʃiˈeɪ ʃən)

n.
1. the changing of one substance into another.
2. (in the Eucharist) the conversion of the whole substance of the bread and wine into the body and blood of Christ, only the appearance of bread and wine remaining.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

transubstantiation

the doctrine that the consecrated elements of the communion only appear as bread and wine, for they have been converted into the whole substance of the body and blood of Christ. Cf. consubstantiation, receptionism, virtualism. — transubstantiationalist, n.
See also: Theology
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.transubstantiation - the Roman Catholic doctrine that the whole substance of the bread and the wine changes into the substance of the body and blood of Christ when consecrated in the Eucharisttransubstantiation - the Roman Catholic doctrine that the whole substance of the bread and the wine changes into the substance of the body and blood of Christ when consecrated in the Eucharist
theological doctrine - the doctrine of a religious group
2.transubstantiation - an act that changes the form or character or substance of somethingtransubstantiation - an act that changes the form or character or substance of something
conversion - the act of changing from one use or function or purpose to another
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

transubstantiation

noun
The process or result of changing from one appearance, state, or phase to another:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
eðlisbreytingeðlisbreytingarkenningingjörbreytingmyndbreytingummyndun

transubstantiation

[ˈtrænsəbˌstænʃɪˈeɪʃən] Ntransubstanciación f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

transubstantiation

n (Rel) → Wandlung f, → Transsubstantiation f (spec)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

transubstantiation

[ˈtrænsəbˌstænʃɪˈeɪʃn] n (Rel) → transustanziazione f
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
TRANSUBSTANTIATION. But Christ wanted to remain present, too, to be with us physically - not just to be remembered.
They called it 'transubstantiation,' which is essentially no different from alchemy or magic.
Among the topics are painted stone: idea and practice in the Italian Renaissance, the matter of similitude: stone paintings and the limits of representation in Cavaliere d'Arpino's Perseus and Andromeda and Jacques Stella's Jacob's Dream, glances into stone: Hans von Aachen's paintings on stone, micromosaic materiality and transubstantiation in an icon of Christ at Santa Croce in Gerusalmemme in Rome, and Salvator Rosa: a variety of surfaces.
In 1947, Jackson Pollock made Full Fathom Five the title of one his most materially dense drip paintings, suggesting a kind of transubstantiation. The nails, tacks, and cigarette butts embedded in the canvas had been raised up into the visual field of high modernism.
This leaves people who suffer from gluten intolerance little choice but to refrain from partaking in the occasion that observes doctrine of transubstantiation, according to which the Communion wafer and wine symbolizes the Body and Blood of Jesus Christ respectively.
Roman Catholics believe bread and wine served at the Eucharist are converted into the body and blood of Christ through a process known as transubstantiation. Reported by BBC.
These sculptures underlined the theology of Incarnation and Transubstantiation, and implicitly also the Resurrection.
The book focuses on the operations of disknowledge in several areas of human knowledge, ranging from transubstantiation, to Kabbalah, to human reproduction, to concepts of fictionality.
In addition to a careful examination of the primary text, George uses both John Tillotson's discussion of transubstantiation and Ludwig Wittgenstein's discussions of religion to elucidate Hume's arguments.
I'm not sure how much of this wine goes through transubstantiation (you might have to google that) before it's consumed, but it's a fair drop.
When he was appointed commander of Virginia's military forces, George Washington was required to sign an anti-Catholic "test oath" disclaiming belief in such doctrines as transubstantiation, the changing of bread and wine into the body and blood of Christ.