transumption

Related to transumption: Metaleptic

transumption

(trænˈsʌmpʃən)
n
1. an act of metaphorical transference
2. (Anthropology & Ethnology) anthropol previously, the ritual of eating the dead bodies of loved ones in tribes of Papua New Guinea and India
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References in periodicals archive ?
For Bloom, the final trope of misreading is "a metalepsis or transumption of the process of reading (and writing) poems, a final ratio of revision that I have named apophrades, or the return of the precursors" (73).
Harold Bloom's notion of "transumption" or "metaleptic reversal" might help here to clarify the dynamics of one of Arthur's most pathetic and affecting lines: "Authority forgets a dying king" (l.
If the relationship in "The Mythological Poet" is a variation on the filial relationship we see throughout the book, then the union with which the poem closes can be seen as a return to the story of generational succession elaborated in the first part of the poem, in which the "toothless murmuring / Of ancient willows" gives birth to a "new / music." In Bloom's account, the "primal scene of instruction" enacts a "scheme of transumption or metaleptic reversal" (49) in an attempt to "recover the prestige of origins" (59), and that is precisely what is accomplished in the closing image of the poem, which presents a prophecy of desired union that is also a return to--and reversal of--the traumatic break with tradition out of which Ashbery's "new music" is born.
The visual rhetoric of these views involves "transumption," making something distant appear immediately present by eliminating the intermediate steps between near and far.
Chapter 7, titled "Ansia perpetua," is an analysis of "Cancion de una muchacha muerta" and it demonstrates a surrealist's "transumption" of Becquer.
Magnuson pays close attention to tropes of mediation and address, such as apostrophe and prosopopoeia, and he highlights most prominently the trope of allusion--particularly transumption, or interpretive allusion.
Walker wisely refuses to treat the "sublime" reductively: in Herman Voaden's experiments with "symphonic expressionism" Walker argues that "the sublime provides the essential source of discontinuity with tradition and the introduction of a new authority." This "new authority" can be internalized and allows playwrights access to the "noumenal forces latent in nature" (17); taken this way, the sublime has empowered Canadian playwrights to claim here as here and to do so, in part, through the "transumption of European conventions" as long as those conventions--once "transumed"--led (and indeed still lead) to a "revolt within the Canadian imagination" (19).
For Genette, a transumption or metalepsis is the transit of a character from one diegetic level to another (234); this can be taken to correspond to the transit among sealed cosmic levels in an allegorical cosmography--Dante's ascent to paradiso or the Keplerian Daemon's descent to Earth.
Blicero's transumption into the Zone provides a sobering counterpoint to the potentially liberating quality of Slothrop's own textualization.
Elliot, "The Ethics of Repression: Deconstruction's Historical Transumption of History," New Literary History, Vol.
Keats manages, or seems to manage, his transumption of Shakespeare when the Shakespearean figure is left with the consciousness of a latecomer, is left, that is, conscious of belatedness.
after all, in something like a Bloomian transumption or metaleptic