transumptive

Related to transumptive: Metaleptic

transumptive

(trænˈsʌmptɪv)
adj
of or relating to transumption
References in periodicals archive ?
In order to assist the reader, I go back to Chapter 24 in order to recall the importance that the impositio nominis holds in this chapter, openly constructed as it is on a technique that can also be called transumptive. This nomination leads to questions about the name of Beatrice, which in turn leads to another question: Which nominatio could thus be given to the "I" or author, since he is the one who is related to Beatrice (according to John's Gospel and Augustine, he is the husband, and we may recognize him from the bride).
Thus, this intertextual and transumptive act of taking names from the real world and using them in a fictive text represents another narrative level.
There is a transumptive magic by which a work of criticism comes to resemble its subject matter while maintaining a critical purchase upon it and thereby takes on the unique power of the thing under discussion.
transumptive iura dicuntur naturalia" (DP II, XII, 7, S 268,7-15).
And she replied: "Absolutely correct." (11) If Brodsky and Akhmatova are correct in their identification of Mandel'shtam's precursor (and one may note that the word predtecha with its Christological connotations, has a transumptive dimension, implying that Pushkin prepared the way for Mandel'shtam's greater glory and greater sacrifice), and if Akhmatova's earlier blindness to this possibility is significant, then it is appropriate to establish not only what it may mean to experience what Mandel'shtam termed "priamoe, kanonicheskoe vliianie Pushkina," (12) (the direct, canonical influence of Pushkin) or the most appropriate ways to study it, but also to consider how best to study less obvious cases of influence.
The journeys of the traditional somnium coeleste (of the sorts Dante, Chaucer, and Kepler's Fiolxhilde or her Daemon undergo) can be seen to correspond to the transumptive collapsing of levels within any formalized structural narratology--either Booth's Aristotelian version, Gerard Genette's Saussurian one, or Rotman's Peircean one.
Jarrell's generous and humane tribute is very different from such recent bullying appropriations as that of Harold Bloom in Wallace Stevens: The Poems of Our Climate (1977), a book both grotesquely jargon-ridden (the likes of "transumptive" "kenosis" "clinamen" and "aporia" fall like bird droppings) and monomaniacally obsessed with a King Charles's head of a theory (on every --literally every--page Bloom insists that Stevens is groaning under the influence of Emerson, whom Stevens in fact disliked, and of Whitman, whom he liked well this side of idolatry).
He takes a cue from Fletcher's claim that Milton has a "transumptive style" because Milton saw nature, as Dr.
(4) In his discussion of the power of the Puritan system of exemplification, Mitchell Robert Breitweiser explains how this rhetorical strategy enabled Puritan ministers, readers, and writers to "negat(e) the specific significances of its objects in order to absorb them in transumptive representation ..."(53).
Similarly resumptive and transumptive in his allusions is Stephen Rodefer:
All three scholars may be correct, since Bloom's theories allow for extensive 'transumptive' allusion as much as for the repression of quotation; but a discussion of the problematic nature of literary influence is sorely needed.
Likewise, he examines Pater's Plato in this light in his first chapter dealing with transumptive afterthoughts as he considers the Plato Pater invents and invests with his own thought.