trapdoor spider


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trap·door spider

 (trăp′dôr′)
n.
Any of various spiders of the family Ctenizidae, found in warm climates, that construct a silk-lined burrow concealed by a hinged lid.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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Here, friendly guide Kerry, a member of the Gubbi Gubbi people, took me on a bush walk through the trees to teach me about survival skills - how to spot trapdoor spider nests!
In Western Australia, a trapdoor spider Anidiops villosus revived about an hour after being removed from a container of water (Cannon 2016).
Scientists called her Gaius villosus -- one of dozens of trapdoor spider species that lived in the vanishing wilderness of the Australian wheat belt.
"Through Barbara's detailed research, we were able to determine that the extensive lifespan of the trapdoor spider is due to their life-history traits, including how they live in uncleared, native bushland, their sedentary nature and low metabolisms," said Mason.
Scientists in Australia reported that the world's oldest known spider, a female Giaus Villosus or trapdoor spider, recently died during a long-term population study.
"My students' favourite Skvpe session was when the arachnologisf on the expedition placed o decently sized trapdoor spider on my hand and it scuttled up my arm wh, el feigned being brave in front of my students."--Mary-Anne
A spokeswoman for the project told AAP the 13 new spider types included a brush-footed trapdoor spider and the newly named mouse spider, which lives in a stocking-shaped web.
Two new species of the arboreal trapdoor spider genus Sason (Araneae: Barychelidae) from Southeast Asia.
Meanwhile in Hollywood, Angelina Jolie has a trapdoor spider named after her called Aptostichus angelinajolieae, while a Duke University professor has named a special genus of ferns after the singing sensation Lady Gaga, which can be found in Central and South America, Mexico, Arizona and Texas.
Aptostichus barackobamai (below) joins 32 other newly described species of trapdoor spider, a group known for building hinged doors to hide the entrances to their underground burrows.