trapeze

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Related to trapezes: trapezius muscle

tra·peze

 (tră-pēz′, trə-)
n.
1. A short horizontal bar suspended from two parallel ropes, used for gymnastic exercises or for acrobatic stunts.
2. Nautical A cable rigged to support a sailor in hiking out on a racing yacht.
3. An article of clothing, such as a jacket, dress, or coat, that is cut so as to hang down from the shoulders and swing out and away around the hips and legs.

[French trapèze, from Late Latin trapezium, trapezoid; see trapezium.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

trapeze

(trəˈpiːz)
n
1. (Gymnastics) a free-swinging bar attached to two ropes, used by circus acrobats, etc
2. (Nautical Terms) a sling like a bosun's chair at one end of a line attached to the masthead of a light racing sailing boat, used in sitting out
[C19: from French trapèze, from New Latin; see trapezium]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

tra•peze

(træˈpiz; esp. Brit. trə-)

n.
an apparatus, used in gymnastics and acrobatics, consisting of a short horizontal bar attached to the ends of two suspended ropes.
[1860–65; < French trapèze, literally, trapezium]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.trapeze - a swing used by circus acrobatstrapeze - a swing used by circus acrobats  
swing - mechanical device used as a plaything to support someone swinging back and forth
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
أرْجوحَه
visutá hrazda
trapez
fimleikaróla
trapecija
trapece
visutá hrazda

trapeze

[trəˈpiːz]
A. Ntrapecio m
B. CPD trapeze artist Ntrapecista mf
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

trapeze

[trəˈpiːz] ntrapèze mtrapeze artist ntrapéziste mf
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

trapeze

n (in circus) → Trapez nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

trapeze

[trəˈpiːz] n (di circo) → trapezio
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

trapeze

(trəˈpiːz) , ((American) trӕ-) noun
a horizontal bar hung on two ropes, on which gymnasts or acrobats perform. They performed on the trapeze; (also adjective) a trapeze artist.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

trapeze

n (for a hospital bed) trapecio (para una cama hospitalaria)
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in classic literature ?
Invent a piano which will respond as delicately to the turning of a handle as our present ones do to the pressure of the fingers, and the acrobats will be driven back to their carpets and trapezes, because the sole faculty necessary to the executant musician will be the musical faculty, and no other will enable him to obtain a hearing."
She did trapeze work and used to dive from under the roof into a net, turning over once on the way as nice as you please.
He was watching with much amusement a quarrel between a couple of trapeze artists.
This agony of embarrassment was due to the fact that the sister-in-law was sitting opposite to him, in a dress, specially put on, as he fancied, for his benefit, cut particularly open, in the shape of a trapeze, on her white bosom.
Two are in South Africa now, an' another's on a whaling voyage, an' one's travellin' with a circus - he does trapeze work.
When I left for college, I managed a few flying trapezes which helped me pay for school."
The trapezes method consists in approximating the representative curve for the P([omega]) variation--the real part of the transfer function of the automated system--together with line segments [6].
At the Lansdowne classes there are two trapezes, one reassuringly close to the ground for beginners and both with crash mats below for a soft landing, should one be required.
As if their ripped bodies and dynamic careers weren't enough, Gaulthier and Hall, both 41, train together at Le Studio, hanging from trapezes and literally swinging from the rafters.
Between Trapezes: Flying into a New Life with the Greatest of Ease
Sandback intuitively understood this dilemma, which is why he conceived of his rectangles, trapezes, squares, etc., as evanescent, intangible slices of space whose limits are only to be mentally completed: As soon as these geometrical figures coalesce in front of our eyes, they disappear again at our slightest motion.