traumatic brain injury


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Related to traumatic brain injury: Mild traumatic brain injury

traumatic brain injury

n. Abbr. TBI
Injury to the brain caused by an external force such as a violent blow to the head, resulting in loss of consciousness, memory loss, dizziness, and confusion, and in some cases leading to long-term health effects, including motor and sensory problems, cognitive and behavioral dysfunction, and dementia.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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National Institute of Child Health and Human Development has more about traumatic brain injury in children.
Children and adolescents accounted for approximately one million non-fatal traumatic brain injury cases treated in emergency departments per year.
Monitoring of invasive intracranial pressure is not possible in every patient and is contraindicated in some as they pose the patient to the risk of bleeding, meningitis, sepsis etc, so a less invasive and sensitive test is needed to do measure the intracranial pressure at bedside and have an idea of intracranial pressure in a traumatic brain injury patients.
"In this fall, he suffered a massive, traumatic brain injury.
For the study, researchers followed 347 children with either mild traumatic brain injury, complicated-mild injury, or orthopedic injury to monitor their recovery from mild traumatic brain injury.
Official position of the military TBI task force on the role of neuropsychology and rehabilitation psychology in the evaluation, management, and research of military veterans with traumatic brain injury. Clin Neuropsychol.
Traumatic brain injury is caused by external force to the head resulting in immediate damage to nerve cells.
Nicolas Bailly, Ph.D., from Universite de la Mediterranee in Marseille, France, and colleagues assessed the effect of helmet use on risk of traumatic brain injury and other types of head injury in alpine sports using data collected by physicians in on-mountain clinics in 30 French ski resorts (2012 to 2014).
"In most sports, where there's competition, collisions can sometimes be inevitable and it's those collisions that often can result in a concussion-in traumatic brain injury," said Dr.
Sustaining a traumatic brain injury (TBT) in your 20s may increase the risk of developing dementia including Alzheimer's in your 50s by 60 per cent, a review of nearly three million patients has revealed.

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