trawling


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Related to trawling: drift netting

trawl

 (trôl)
n.
1. A trawl net.
2. See setline.
3.
a. An act of trawling, as for fish.
b. An act of searching for or examining something: A trawl of local records produced some leads.
v. trawled, trawl·ing, trawls
v.tr.
1. To catch (fish) with a trawl.
2. To fish (an area) with a trawl.
3.
a. To search (an area) or go to (different places) in search of something: trawled the shops for a bargain.
b. To make an examination of something: trawled the archives for a manuscript.
v.intr.
1. To fish with a trawl.
2. To troll.
3.
a. To search for or try to acquire something: a contractor trawling for day laborers.
b. To make an examination of something: trawling through a writer's papers.

[Possibly Middle English trawelle, perhaps from Middle Dutch tragel, dragnet, possibly from Latin trāgula, from trahere, to drag. V. tr., sense 3a, and v. intr., sense 2, influenced by troll.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

trawling

(ˈtrɔːlɪŋ)
n
(Fishing) fishing using a trawl net or trawl line
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
Translations
chalutage

trawling

[ˈtrɔːlɪŋ] Npesca f a la rastra
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

trawling

nDampfer- or Trawlfischerei f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

trawling

[ˈtrɔːlɪŋ] npesca a strascico
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
"I don't know what this is, if 'tisn't regular trawling," said Harvey, sulkily.
There has long been concern about police trawling, in which detectives contact former residents of children's homes from the 1960s and 1970s to ask if they were abused.
The destructive bottom trawling gear used in many commercial fisheries is the most widespread human threat to deep-sea corals.
For many years, the National Trust has raised concerns about the dramatic loss of the mussel beds, and the impact on them of trawling for other shellfish, particularly Queen Scallops.
"There's an immediate threat to the biodiversity of seamounts, coral and other species from bottom trawling. A moratorium allows some breathing room," said Matthew Gianni, a biologist from the Netherlands who is among the scientists pushing for change.
TRAWLING FOR PRAWNS and scallops is like raking and vacuuming the sea floor.
Fortunately, we've found trawling to be effective for sampling shovelnose and pallid sturgeon in the lower Mississippi, although it is somewhat limited at depths below 40 feet (12 m).
Central to this was so-called 'trawling', where police make unsolicited contact with former residents of the homes to see if any further abuse allegations arise.
It's called trawling, and one police official admits it's "the reverse of normal police procedures." The process is simple: Officers go to residents or former residents of institutions for troubled teens and question them about their caretakers.
Trawling gear devastates the world's continental shelves
One of the major points of modification is that Japan accepts the double-ship trawling method to be used by up to 80 South Korean boats in Japan's 200-mile exclusive economic zone.