treacherous


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treach·er·ous

 (trĕch′ər-əs)
adj.
1. Guilty of or characterized by betrayal of confidence or trust; perfidious.
2. Characterized by unforeseen or hidden hazards; dangerous or deceptive: treacherous waters; treacherous footing.

treach′er·ous·ly adv.
treach′er·ous·ness n.

treacherous

(ˈtrɛtʃərəs)
adj
1. betraying or likely to betray faith or confidence
2. unstable, unreliable, or dangerous: treacherous weather; treacherous ground.
ˈtreacherously adv
ˈtreacherousness n

treach•er•ous

(ˈtrɛtʃ ər əs)

adj.
1. characterized by faithlessness or readiness to betray trust.
2. deceptive, untrustworthy, or unreliable.
3. unstable or insecure, as footing.
4. dangerous; hazardous: a treacherous climb.
treach′er•ous•ly, adv.
treach′er•ous•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.treacherous - dangerously unstable and unpredictabletreacherous - dangerously unstable and unpredictable; "treacherous winding roads"; "an unreliable trestle"
dangerous, unsafe - involving or causing danger or risk; liable to hurt or harm; "a dangerous criminal"; "a dangerous bridge"; "unemployment reached dangerous proportions"
2.treacherous - tending to betraytreacherous - tending to betray; especially having a treacherous character as attributed to the Carthaginians by the Romans; "Punic faith"; "the perfidious Judas"; "the fiercest and most treacherous of foes"; "treacherous intrigues"
unfaithful - not true to duty or obligation or promises; "an unfaithful lover"

treacherous

adjective
1. disloyal, deceitful, untrustworthy, duplicitous, false, untrue, unreliable, unfaithful, faithless, double-crossing (informal), double-dealing, perfidious, traitorous, treasonable, recreant (archaic) The President spoke of the treacherous intentions of the enemy.
disloyal true, reliable, loyal, faithful, dependable, trustworthy
2. dangerous, tricky, risky, unstable, hazardous, icy, slippery, unsafe, unreliable, precarious, deceptive, perilous, slippy (informal or dialect) The current of the river is fast-flowing and treacherous.
dangerous safe, reliable

treacherous

adjective
2. Involving possible risk, loss, or injury:
Slang: hairy.
Translations
خائِن، غادِرخَطِر
nebezpečnýzrádný
farligforræderisk
ótraustursvikull
bīstamsnedrošsnodevīgs
izdajalski

treacherous

[ˈtretʃərəs] ADJ
1. (= disloyal) [person] → traidor; [attempt, intention] → traicionero
a treacherous act or actionuna traición
2. (= dangerous) [road, bend] → peligroso; [tide, current] → traicionero
treacherous road or driving conditionscondiciones peligrosas para la conducción

treacherous

[ˈtrɛtʃərəs] adj
[person, act] → déloyal(e)
He publicly left the party and denounced its treacherous leaders → Il rendit publiquement sa carte du parti et dénonça la traîtrise de ses chefs.
(= dangerous) [conditions, roads] → dangereux/euse; [currents] → traître(traîtresse)
Road conditions are treacherous → Les routes sont dangereuses.
Even experienced navigators feared the treacherous currents → Même les navigateurs expérimentés craignaient les courants traîtres.

treacherous

adj
person, actionverräterisch
(= unreliable)trügerisch, irreführend; memorytrügerisch; my memory is rather treacherous nowmein Gedächtnis lässt mich neuerdings ziemlich im Stich
(= dangerous)tückisch; cornergefährlich; weather conditions, icetrügerisch; journeygefahrvoll

treacherous

[ˈtrɛtʃrəs] adj (disloyal, person, act) → sleale; (smile) → traditore/trice; (answer) → infido/a (fig) (surface, ground, tide) → pericoloso/a
road conditions today are treacherous → oggi il fondo stradale è pericoloso

treacherous

(ˈtretʃərəs) adjective
1. betraying or likely to betray. a treacherous person/act.
2. dangerous. The roads are treacherous in winter.
ˈtreacherously adverb
ˈtreacherousness noun
ˈtreachery noun
(an act of) betraying someone; disloyalty. His treachery led to the capture and imprisonment of his friend.
References in classic literature ?
You will all agree," said he, "that our chief danger consists in the sly and treacherous manner in which the enemy approaches us.
Glimpses do ye seem to see of that mortally intolerable truth; that all deep, earnest thinking is but the intrepid effort of the soul to keep the open independence of her sea; while the wildest winds of heaven and earth conspire to cast her on the treacherous, slavish shore?
To proceed, then: Don Fernando finding my presence an obstacle to the execution of his treacherous and wicked design, resolved to send me to his elder brother under the pretext of asking money from him to pay for six horses which, purposely, and with the sole object of sending me away that he might the better carry out his infernal scheme, he had purchased the very day he offered to speak to my father, and the price of which he now desired me to fetch.
Our talk had been serious and sober, But our thoughts they were palsied and sere -- Our memories were treacherous and sere; For we knew not the month was October, And we marked not the night of the year --(Ah, night of all nights in the year
I was not unprepared for jagged rocks and treacherous shoals if I could only have change -- change and the excitement of the unforeseen.
We both had to smile at the use of my royal title, yet I was indeed still "Emperor of Pellucidar," and some day I meant to rebuild what the vile act of the treacherous Hooja had torn down.
As one after another the treacherous roots yielded to my grasp, and fell into the torrent, my heart sunk within me.
This event has annoyed and alarmed my master very seriously; and to make matters worse, on the day when the girl's treacherous conduct was discovered, the admiral was seized with the first symptoms of a severe inflammatory cold.
And there are justifiable strandings in fogs, on uncharted seas, on dangerous shores, through treacherous tides.
Edward Rose, the interpreter, whose sinister looks we have already mentioned, was denounced by this secret informer as a designing, treacherous scoundrel, who was tampering with the fidelity of certain of the men, and instigating them to a flagrant piece of treason.
She said, she could not help agreeing with her brother, that there was some merit in the sincerity of her confession, and in her integrity to her lover: that she had always thought her a very good girl, and doubted not but she had been seduced by some rascal, who had been infinitely more to blame than herself, and very probably had prevailed with her by a promise of marriage, or some other treacherous proceeding.
Wilcox had been treacherous to the family, to the laws of property, to her own written word.