treason

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trea·son

 (trē′zən)
n.
1. The betrayal of allegiance toward one's own country, especially by committing hostile acts against it or aiding its enemies in committing such acts.
2. The betrayal of someone's trust or confidence.

[Middle English, from Anglo-Norman treson, from Latin trāditiō, trāditiōn-, a handing over; see tradition.]

treason

(ˈtriːzən)
n
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) violation or betrayal of the allegiance that a person owes his sovereign or his country, esp by attempting to overthrow the government; high treason
2. any treachery or betrayal
[C13: from Old French traïson, from Latin trāditiō a handing over; see tradition, traditor]
ˈtreasonable, ˈtreasonous adj
ˈtreasonableness n
ˈtreasonably adv

trea•son

(ˈtri zən)

n.
1. the offense of acting to overthrow one's government or to harm or kill its sovereign.
2. a violation of allegiance to one's sovereign or state.
3. the betrayal of a trust or confidence; treachery.
[1175–1225; Middle English tre(i)so(u)n < Anglo-French; Old French traïson < Latin trāditiōnem, acc. of trāditiō a handing over. See tradition]
syn: treason, sedition mean disloyalty or treachery to one's country or its government. treason is any attempt to overthrow the government or impair the well-being of a state to which one owes allegiance. According to the U.S. Constitution, it is the crime of levying war against the U.S. or giving aid and comfort to its enemies. sedition is any act, writing, speech, etc., directed unlawfully against state authority, the government, or the constitution, or calculated to bring it into contempt or to incite others to hostility or disaffection; it does not amount to treason and therefore is not a capital offense.

treason

Violation of the allegiance owed to one's sovereign or state; betrayal of one's country.

Treason

See also crime.

an act of cooperating with an invader of one’s country. — collaborationist, n.
1. breach of trust, especially treachery or treason.
2. an act or instance of this. — perfidious, adj.
cowardice, treason, or disloyalty. — recreant, n., adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.treason - a crime that undermines the offender's governmenttreason - a crime that undermines the offender's government
crime, criminal offence, criminal offense, law-breaking, offense, offence - (criminal law) an act punishable by law; usually considered an evil act; "a long record of crimes"
2.treason - disloyalty by virtue of subversive behaviortreason - disloyalty by virtue of subversive behavior
disloyalty - the quality of being disloyal
betrayal - the quality of aiding an enemy
3.treason - an act of deliberate betrayaltreason - an act of deliberate betrayal  
knavery, dishonesty - lack of honesty; acts of lying or cheating or stealing
double cross, double-crossing - an act of betrayal; "he gave us the old double cross"; "I could no longer tolerate his impudent double-crossing"
sellout - an act of betrayal

treason

noun disloyalty, mutiny, treachery, subversion, disaffection, duplicity, sedition, perfidy, lese-majesty, traitorousness Queen of England for nine days, she was beheaded for treason.
loyalty, allegiance, fidelity, patriotism, faithfulness, fealty
Quotations
"Treason doth never prosper, what's the reason"
"For if it prosper, none dare call it treason" [Sir John Harington Epigrams]

treason

noun
1. Willful violation of allegiance to one's country:
2. Willful betrayal of fidelity, confidence, or trust:
Translations
خِيانَه
velezradavlastizradazrada
højforræderilandsforræderi
hazaárulás
föîurlandssvik, landráî
išdavimas
nodevība
vlastizrada
izdaja
vatana ihanet

treason

[ˈtriːzn] Ntraición f
high treasonalta traición f

treason

[ˈtriːzən] ntrahison f

treason

nVerrat m (→ to an +dat); an act of treasonVerrat m

treason

[ˈtriːzn] ntradimento

treason

(ˈtriːzn) noun
(also high treason) disloyalty to, or betrayal of, one's own country. They were convicted of (high) treason.
References in classic literature ?
But as new-fangled and artificial treasons have been the great engines by which violent factions, the natural offspring of free government, have usually wreaked their alternate malignity on each other, the convention have, with great judgment, opposed a barrier to this peculiar danger, by inserting a constitutional definition of the crime, fixing the proof necessary for conviction of it, and restraining the Congress, even in punishing it, from extending the consequences of guilt beyond the person of its author.
New Distribution of Horses- Secret Information of Treason in the Camp.
Edward Rose, the interpreter, whose sinister looks we have already mentioned, was denounced by this secret informer as a designing, treacherous scoundrel, who was tampering with the fidelity of certain of the men, and instigating them to a flagrant piece of treason.
They shall in all Cases, except Treason, Felony and Breach of the Peace, be privileged from Arrest during their Attendance at the Session of their respective Houses, and in going to and returning from the same; and for any Speech or Debate in either House, they shall not be questioned in any other Place.
The President, Vice President and all civil Officers of the United States, shall be removed from Office on Impeachment for, and Conviction of, Treason, Bribery, or other high Crimes and Misdemeanors.
The President of the United States would be liable to be impeached, tried, and, upon conviction of treason, bribery, or other high crimes or misdemeanors, removed from office; and would afterwards be liable to prosecution and punishment in the ordinary course of law.
The governor of New York may pardon in all cases, even in those of impeachment, except for treason and murder.
This lord, in conjunction with Flimnap the high-treasurer, whose enmity against you is notorious on account of his lady, Limtoc the general, Lalcon the chamberlain, and Balmuff the grand justiciary, have prepared articles of impeachment against you, for treason and other capital crimes.
The upshot of all this was that when Boxtel, who watched the course of political events much more attentively than his neighbour Cornelius was used to do, heard the news of the brothers De Witt being arrested on a charge of high treason against the States, he thought within his heart that very likely he needed only to say one word, and the godson would be arrested as well as the godfather.
Don't you know you are guilty of treason, and that there is a law against treason?
You must, nevertheless, have committed a crime, since you are here and are accused of high treason.
In the matter of Treason the pig would appear To have aided, but scarcely abetted: While the charge of Insolvency fails, it is clear, If you grant the plea 'never indebted.