treatise

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treatise

formal exposition in writing of the principles of a subject, more detailed than an essay
Not to be confused with:
treaties – formal agreements; formal documents embodying an agreement; compacts
Abused, Confused, & Misused Words by Mary Embree Copyright © 2007, 2013 by Mary Embree

trea·tise

 (trē′tĭs)
n.
A systematic, usually extensive written discourse on a subject.

[Middle English treatis, from Anglo-Norman tretiz, alteration of treteiz, from Vulgar Latin *tractātīcius, from Latin tractātus, past participle of tractāre, to drag about, deal with; see treat.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

treatise

(ˈtriːtɪz)
n
1. a formal work on a subject, esp one that deals systematically with its principles and conclusions
2. an obsolete word for narrative
[C14: from Anglo-French tretiz, from Old French tretier to treat]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

trea•tise

(ˈtri tɪs)

n.
a formal and systematic exposition in writing of the principles of a subject, generally longer and more detailed than an essay.
[1300–50; Middle English tretis < Anglo-French tretiz, akin to Old French traitier to treat]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.treatise - a formal expositiontreatise - a formal exposition      
piece of writing, written material, writing - the work of a writer; anything expressed in letters of the alphabet (especially when considered from the point of view of style and effect); "the writing in her novels is excellent"; "that editorial was a fine piece of writing"
dissertation, thesis - a treatise advancing a new point of view resulting from research; usually a requirement for an advanced academic degree
pamphlet, tract - a brief treatise on a subject of interest; published in the form of a booklet
monograph - a detailed and documented treatise on a particular subject
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

treatise

noun paper, work, writing, study, essay, thesis, tract, pamphlet, exposition, dissertation, monograph, disquisition Locke's treatise on Civil Government
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

treatise

noun
A formal, lengthy exposition of a topic:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
بَحْث، رِسالَه في مَوضوع
pojednání
afhandling
fræîileg ritgerî
apcerējumstraktāts
rozprava
bilimsel incelemetez

treatise

[ˈtriːtɪz] Ntratado m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

treatise

[ˈtriːtɪz] ntraité m (ouvrage)
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

treatise

nAbhandlung f (→ on über +acc)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

treatise

[ˈtriːtɪz] ntrattato
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

treatise

(ˈtriːtiz) , ((American) -s) noun
a long, detailed, formal piece of writing on some subject. He wrote a treatise on methods of education.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
It is well worth while carefully to study the several treatises published on some of our old cultivated plants, as on the hyacinth, potato, even the dahlia, &c.; and it is really surprising to note the endless points in structure and constitution in which the varieties and sub-varieties differ slightly from each other.
Many treatises in different languages have been published on pigeons, and some of them are very important, as being of considerably antiquity.
We know this because he wrote a book, called A Treatise on the Astrolabe, for this little son.
Chaucer calls his book A Treatise on the Astrolabe, Bread and Milk for Children.
So I devoted several months in privacy to the composition of a treatise on the mysteries of Three Dimensions.
For instance, let us suppose that Homer and Virgil, Aristotle and Cicero, Thucydides and Livy, could have met all together, and have clubbed their several talents to have composed a treatise on the art of dancing: I believe it will be readily agreed they could not have equalled the excellent treatise which Mr Essex hath given us on that subject, entitled, The Rudiments of Genteel Education.
The Politics of Aristotle is the second part of a treatise of which the Ethics is the first part.
Even when a treatise on medicine or natural science is brought out in verse, the name of poet is by custom given to the author; and yet Homer and Empedocles have nothing in common but the metre, so that it would be right to call the one poet, the other physicist rather than poet.
The following extract from an ancient treatise on the art of poetry called `Ming-Chung' sets forth most clearly certain ideals to be pursued:
But because I have essayed to expound the chief of these discoveries in a treatise which certain considerations prevent me from publishing, I cannot make the results known more conveniently than by here giving a summary of the contents of this treatise.
While these things were going on in the open air, an elderly gentleman of scientific attainments was seated in his library, two or three houses off, writing a philosophical treatise, and ever and anon moistening his clay and his labours with a glass of claret from a venerable-looking bottle which stood by his side.
In his treatise on Queen-Gold, or Queen-pinmoney, an old King's Bench author, one William Prynne, thus discourseth: Ye tail is ye Queen's, that ye Queen's wardrobe may be supplied with ye whalebone.